Mandervul History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Mandervul reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Mandervul family lived in Mandeville, near Valognes, Cotentin, Normandy. In Mandeville, the Norman Mandervul family were nobles who possessed a castle and vast estates. [1]

"Upon the first arrival in England of the Conqueror, there was amongst his companions a famous soldier, called Geffray de Magnavil, so designated from the town of Magnavil in the Duchy of Normandy, who obtained as his share in the spoil of conquest, divers fair and wide spreading domains in the counties of Berks, Suffolk, Middlesex, Surrey, Oxford, Cambridge, Harts, Northampton, Warwick, and Essex. The grandson of this richly gifted noble, another Geoffrey de Mandeville, was advanced by King Stephen to the Earldom of Essex." [2]

Early Origins of the Mandervul family

The surname Mandervul was first found in Wiltshire where they were anciently granted lands by William Duke of Normandy for their assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. Geoffrey (Goisfrid) de Mandeville (c.1100) was an important Domesday tenant-in-chief; he was granted large estates in Essex, and in ten other shires by William, and was Constable of the Tower of London. [3]

They were granted no less than 118 Lordships after the Conquest. William's descendent Geoffrey de Mandeville (d. 1144,) was created the 1st Earl of Essex, a title which became extinct in the 12th century after the death of the 3rd Earl.

The chief seat of the Mandevilles was at Walden in Essex, but many junior lines abounded. "Jehan de Mandeville", translated as "Sir John Mandeville", was noted as the compiler of a singular book of supposed travels, written in Anglo-Norman French, published between 1357 and 1371. They were Lords of the Manor of Earl's Stoke, in Wiltshire and also were granted lands in Devon.

Early rolls proved their widespread influence. Ernulf de Mandeuill was recorded in the Pipe Rolls for Wiltshire in 1158 and later, William de Manevell was found in Berkshire in the Curia Regis Rolls for 1210. Willaim de Manewell was registered in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296. [4]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 included: Nigel de Manderville, Berkshire; and Ernald de Maundeville, Suffolk. [5]

The Testa de Nevill, sive Liber Feodorum, temp. Henry III- Edward I listed Walter de Maundevill, Kent, 20 Edward I (during the twentieth year of King Edward I's reign.) [6]

Early History of the Mandervul family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mandervul research. Another 89 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1357, 1357, 1371, 1189, 1670 and 1733 are included under the topic Early Mandervul History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mandervul Spelling Variations

Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Mandervul family name include Mansville, Manvell, Mandeville, Magneville, Magnevilla, Manville, Mannevill, Manneville, Mandevile, Mansvile, Mansville, Mandevill, Manvill, Mansvill, Mansvil, Mandevil, Mandervil, Mandervill, Manderville, Mandavile, Mandavil, Mandavill, Mandaville, Mandavall, Mandavalle, Mandaval, Mandvill, Mandville, Mandvil and many more.

Early Notables of the Mandervul family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was "Jehan de Mandeville", better known as "Sir John Mandeville", ( fl. 1357), English knight born at St. Albans, who complied "The Travels of Sir John Mandeville," a book account of his supposed travels throughout Europe published between 1357 and 1371; William de Mandeville (d. 1189), 3rd Earl...
Another 54 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mandervul Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Mandervul family to Ireland

Some of the Mandervul family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mandervul family

To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Mandervul family to immigrate North America: Gillis Mandeville, who settled in New York in 1659; Miss Mandeville settled in Barbados in 1774; Mary Mandeville settled in Maryland in 1738. In Newfoundland, Canada, Patrick Mandavile from Clonmell, Tipperary, was married in St. John's in 1805.



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)


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