Arshire History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Arshire reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Arshire is for a bowman, and derives from the French L'Archer of the same meaning.

Early Origins of the Arshire family

The surname Arshire was first found in Warwickshire, where "Fulbert L'Archer, the patriarch of the Lords Archer of Umberslade, in the county of Warwick, appears among the warriors at Hastings, who received recompense from the victor. His son, Robert L'Archer, obtained additions to his territorial possessions by grant from Henry I., whose tutor he had been, and still further increased his patrimony by marrying Sebit, daughter of Henry of Villiers, and thus acquiring the lands of Umberslade." [1]

However, another noted source claims Hampshire was the founding place for the family. "Willelmus Arcarius" held a barony in the hundred of Sunburne, in Hampshire. [2] This family took its name from the office it held under the Dukes of Normandy before the Conquest. Its derivation is rather uncertain, but a family of L'Archer, still flourishing in Brittany, bears the same three arrows that were borne by the English Archers, differenced in tincture. The latter claim as their ancestor Fulbert l'Archer, the father of Robert, to whom the Conqueror entrusted the charge of his son, afterwards Henry I. " [3]

Robert Larchier was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Hampshire and Warwickshire in 1166. Hugh le Archer was listed in the Feet of Fines of Cheshire in 1199. [4]

Odo le Archer was listed in Devon during the reign of Henry III and John le Archer was listed in Yorkshire in the reign of Edward I. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1237 list Thomas le Archer in Derbyshire. [5]

Some of the family were found to the far south in the parish of St. Ewe in Cornwall. "There was formerly a manor called Trelewick, but this has many years since been totally dismembered. The barton house was for some time the seat of John Archer, Esq. who died in 1733, to which family the estate belonged. Soon after this gentleman's death the house fell to decay, and remained for many years without an inhabitant. About twenty three years since the fee of Trelewick was sold by Addis Archer, Esq. to the late Mr. John Harris, by whom the dilapidated mansion was taken down, and a genteel farm house erected in its stead." [6]

"There are two gentlemen's seats in the parish of [Lewannick, Cornwall], both of which are ancient; Trewanta Hall, the residence of William Hocken, Esq. and Treliske or Trelaske, the property and abode of Samuel Archer, Esq." [6]

Early History of the Arshire family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Arshire research. Another 274 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1166, 1210, 1214, 1273, 1350, 1296, 1856, 1861, 1554, 1630, 1554, 1598, 1682, 1581, 1662, 1640, 1619, 1685, 1659, 1660, 1581, 1662, 1581, 1551, 1624, 1549, 1551, 1581, 1617, 1624, 1660, 1684, 1660 and are included under the topic Early Arshire History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Arshire Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Arshire are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Arshire include Archer, Archar, Arsher, Arsher, Arshire, Archere and many more.

Early Notables of the Arshire family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Thomas Archer (1554-1630?), an English divine, who was born at Bury St. Edmunds 12 Aug. 1554, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected to a fellowship; John Archer (1598-1682), an English judge from Essex; Sir Simon Archer (1581-1662), an English antiquary and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640, High Sheriff of Warwickshire; and...
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Arshire Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Arshire family to Ireland

Some of the Arshire family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 193 words (14 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Arshire family

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Arshire, or a variant listed above: Samuel Archer who settled in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1630; just ten years after the "Mayflower." He was appointed Marshall in 1650. Henry Archer was another settler in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1639.



The Arshire Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sola bona quae honesta
Motto Translation: Those things only are good which are honest.


  1. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print


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