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Whealler History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Whealler is rooted in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It was originally a name for someone who worked as a wheelwright. In medieval times wheels were wooden and quite fragile and high maintenance. Thus there was a high demand for both wheels and skilled people to make and repair them. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

"The name of Houelleur which means 'charron' [cartwright] in English, is as common, at least in the Cotentin, as that of Carron or Charron. I imagine that it was introduced into Normandy during the thirty-two years' occupation of this country by the English. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Accordingly, the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae lists Osmondus Huielor, Normandy 1198; William and Roger Huelier, 1180-95. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)



Early Origins of the Whealler family


The surname Whealler was first found in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from ancient times, before and after the Norman Conquest in 1066, at Martin Hussingtree.

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 has only one listing for the family: Hugh le Welere, Cambridgeshire. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
Kirby's Quest lists "William Wheler, Somerset, 1 Edward III. [during the first year's reign of King Edward III] " [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.


Early History of the Whealler family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whealler research.
Another 98 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1603, 1604, 1691, 1591, 1601, 1608, 1615, 1620, 1686, 1642, 1648, 1727, 1647, 1648, 1664, 1656, 1694, 1683, 1650, 1723 and 1603 are included under the topic Early Whealler History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Whealler Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Whealler are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Whealler include Wheeler, Wheler, Wheller and others.

Early Notables of the Whealler family (pre 1700)


Distinguished members of the family include John Wheeler ( fl. 1601-1608), secretary of the Merchant Adventurers' Company, was probably born at Great Yarmouth. "He may be identical with the John Wheeler who in 1615 was admitted to the East India Company. " [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
Thomas Wheeler (c.1620-1686), was an English-born, American settler in 1642 and colonial soldier of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Maurice Wheeler (1648?-1727), was an English divine and almanac-maker, born in 1647 or 1648...
Another 71 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Whealler Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Whealler family to Ireland


Some of the Whealler family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Whealler family to the New World and Oceana


Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North America. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Whealler or a variant listed above: Joseph Wheeler who settled in New England in 1630; Mercy Wheeler, who settled in Massachusetts in 1633; Henry Wheeler, who settled in Virginia in 1623.

The Whealler Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Avito jure
Motto Translation: By ancestral right.


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Citations


  1. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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