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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Origins Available: English, Scottish


The Anglo-Saxon name Smorthey comes from when its first bearer worked as a metalworker (the blacksmith). It is derived from the Old English word smid, probably derived form "smitan," which meant "to strike with a hammer." As metal worker was such a common and important profession in Medieval times, this name and its cognates are extremely widespread throughout the British Isles and Europe. However, there is some debate as to why the occupation of blacksmith would lead to such a populous surname. One might expect that Farmer, also an occupational name, but with far more people involved in the profession in the Middle Ages, would today be a much more populous surname than Smith. It is probably a futile exercise to try to establish a single source for this amazing, monumentally prolific surname.

Smorthey Early Origins



The surname Smorthey was first found in Durham, in present day Northumbria (North-Eastern England) where an Olde English version of the name is cited in circa 975, almost 100 years before the Normans would invade this part of England. Some of the family moved to Mount Thoydon in Essex. "The church [of Mount Thoydon] is a handsome edifice, containing many fine monuments to the family of Smyth, among which is one to Sir Thomas Smyth, chancellor of the garter, and principal secretary of state, in the reigns of Edward VI. and Elizabeth." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
"Wootton Hall [in Wooton-Wawen, Warwickshire] was early the seat of the Smythe family, of whom was Lord Carrington, who, at the battle of Edge-Hill, bravely redeemed the royal standard, as is recorded on his monument in Christ-Church, Oxford. Over the front entrance of the Hall are the arms, finely executed in relief, of Lord Carrington. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Smorthey Spelling Variations


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Smorthey Spelling Variations



Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Smorthey include Smith, Smyth, Smythe and others.

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Smorthey Early History


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Smorthey Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Smorthey research. Another 187 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1100, 1279, 1568, 1655, 1559, 1608, 1657, 1640, 1644, 1663, 1631, 1649, 1650, 1652, 1653, 1658, 1616, 1617, 1675, 1621, 1681, 1661, 1679, 1679, 1611, 1691, 1616, 1696, 1662, 1717, 1701, 1665, 1720, 1699 and are included under the topic Early Smorthey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Smorthey Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Smorthey Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of this surname at this time include Richard Smith (1568-1655), officially the Bishop of Chalcedon, the second Catholic bishop for England, Wales and Scotland after Catholicism was banned in England in 1559; John Smith ( c. 1608-1657), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1644...

Another 160 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Smorthey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Smorthey In Ireland


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Smorthey In Ireland



Some of the Smorthey family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 163 words (12 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Smorthey or a variant listed above: Rich Smith, who settled in Virginia in 1638; Abbigall Smith, who was granted land in Virginia in 1673; James Smith and his wife Mary, who immigrated to Boston in 1718 with their children, Abel Smith, who came to Boston in 1763.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Benigno Numine
Motto Translation: By Divine Providence.


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Smorthey Family Crest Products


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Smorthey Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  2. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  3. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  4. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  5. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  6. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  7. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
  8. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  9. Magnusson, Magnus. Chambers Biographical Dictionary 5th edition. Edinburgh: W & R Chambers, 1990. Print.
  10. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  11. ...

The Smorthey Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Smorthey Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 March 2016 at 16:11.

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