Martyon History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancestors of the Martyon family arrived in England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Martyon came from the Latin name Martinus, which is a derivative of Mars, who was the Roman god of fertility and war. The popularity of the name Martin is due to Saint Martin de Tours, who was one of the best known saints in the Western World. With the spread of Christianity, people named their children after saints in the hope that the children might enjoy that saint's patronage. Martin is also one of the few saints' names, other than the names of Old English saints, found in England before the Norman Conquest. [1]

Early Origins of the Martyon family

The surname Martyon was first found in Pembrokeshire. "Martin, Sire of Tour, four miles from Bayeux, came over with William of Normandy in 1066; and conquered the territory of Kemeys in Pembrokeshire. It was erected into a Paltime Barony, which he governed as Lord Marcher, having his castle at Newport, where its ruins still exist. " [2]

"The famous Martin de Tours, who came over from Normandy with the Conqueror was distinguished at the battle of Hastings. Subsequently he acquired by conquest, as one of the Lords Marcher, a large district in Pembrokeshire, called Cemaes or Kemes, and became Palatine Baron thereof, exercising within his territory, subject to feudal homage to the King, all the jura regalia which, at that period, appertained to the crown of the English monarch, He made Newport the head of his Palatinate, and there erected his castle, the ruins of which still exist." [3]

Later, some of the family were found in early times at Westmeston in Sussex. "The church is principally in the early English style, with a plain Norman arch between the nave and chancel; it contains a rudely-constructed circular stone font, and at the east end of the south aisle is an ancient chapel, the burial-place of the Marten family." [4]

And another branch of the family was found at Anstey-Pastures in Leicestershire in early times. "This place, which was formerly parcel of the 'Ffrith of Leicestre,' and of the ancient duchy of Lancaster, was granted in the 27th of Elizabeth to Thomas Martyn and others, on a lease of 31 years, and after the expiration of that term was purchased, in the 4th of James I., from Robert, Earl of Salisbury, lord treasurer of England, by Robert Martyn, of Anstey, whose descendants have a seat here." [4]

Down in the parish of Tamerton, Cornwall, "the manor and barton of Wilsworthy, in this parish, have been in the family of Martyn for many generations. This property now belongs to the Rev. Thomas Waddon Martyn, rector of Luffingcot in Devonshire." [5]

In nearby Devon, Raddon was once held by the Martyns and Audleys in the reign of Henry VIII. [6] "Holsworthy, [Devon has a] market which is one of great antiquity ; and the chief fair was recorded in the time of Edward I. as having belonged to the ancestors of William Martyn from time immemorial." [6]

Early History of the Martyon family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Martyon research. Another 195 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1295, 1446, 1503, 1484, 1492, 1594, 1648, 1643, 1582, 1620, 1617, 1678, 1646, 1660, 1602, 1680, 1640, 1653, 1662, 1621, 1692 and are included under the topic Early Martyon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Martyon Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Martin, Matin, Mattin, Martyn and others.

Early Notables of the Martyon family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir William Martyn of Athelhampton (c. 1446-1503), Sheriff of London in 1484 and Lord Mayor of London in 1492; Sir Richard Martin, Lord Mayor of London in 1594; Robert Martin, Esquire, who was made the Sheriff of the County of Radnour in 1648; Sir Thomas Martin Knight and Baronet, High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingtonshire in 1643; Christopher Martin (ca. 1582-1620), from Essex, was a Pilgrim and signer of the Mayflower Compact; Christopher Martyn (c. 1617-1678), an English politician who sat in the House...
Another 91 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Martyon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Martyon family to Ireland

Some of the Martyon family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 81 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Martyon family

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Martyon or a variant listed above: John Martin, who came to Virginia in 1606; Christopher Martin and his wife, who arrived in America on the Mayflower in 1620; Joe Martin, who settled in Providence, Rhode Island in 1635.



  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 2 of 3
  3. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  6. ^ Worth, R.N., A History of Devonshire London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, E.G., 1895. Digital


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