Lattons History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Lattons is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Lattons family lived in Wiltshire, at the manor of Lattin, from where their name is taken.

Early Origins of the Lattons family

The surname Lattons was first found in Wiltshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Lattin. The family claim to be a junior branch of the Estoutville family of d'Estouteville-en-Caux in Normandy, Governors of the castle of Ambrieres, which branch was part of the senior branch of the family of Roger d'Estouteville, brother of Herluin, founder and first Abbot of Bec, who was reputedly related to the Duke of Normandy. [1]

"William de la Toune occurs in Shropshire during the reign of Edward I. and John de la Doune was Lord of Doune, in that county, in 1316. Ralph de la Thun held land in Woodchurch, Kent, of the King in capite, and died before 1260, 'without heir of his body.' Thomas de Toune, of Throwley, was one of the constables of the Hundred of Faversham during the great Kentish rebellion of 1380." [2]

"John de la Dune, in 1254, held land at Bradewell, in Essex, 'by the serjeancy of carrying one gleyve (gladium) or sword, in the King's army. And, in 1284, Thomas de la Doune, most probably his son, held a tenement in Bradewell by the serjeancy of finding one lance for the King, whenever he should happen to go with an army into Wales.' He died in 1306, leaving an heiress Margaret. Morant suggests that he took his name from Dounhall, his residence ; but it is at least equally likely that his house was named from him. In Surrey, Gregory de la Doune held of William de Windsor at Compton [3]. Sir Roger de la Dune, 'a knight of Middlesex' is mentioned in Staffordshire temp. Henry III. " [2]

The senior branch of the Estoutevilles were granted Lydesdale Castle on the border of England and Scotland, junior sons settled on other estates granted them throughout England. As was customary, second and third sons adopted the surname of the estates. Hence Walter d'Estouteville became Walter Latton of Wiltshire about 1100. Junior branches of this family were, the Lattins of Upton in Berks, Esher in Surrey, and the Morristown Lattins of Kildare in Ireland.

Early History of the Lattons family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lattons research. Another 139 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1290 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Lattons History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lattons Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Lattons are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Lattons include Latton, Lattin, Latin, Lattins, Lattons, Latins, De Latton and many more.

Early Notables of the Lattons family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Lattons Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Lattons family to Ireland

Some of the Lattons family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 122 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Lattons family

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Lattons, or a variant listed above: John Latin who settled in New York State in 1636.



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)


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