Lathin History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Lathin reached English shores for the first time with the ancestors of the Lathin family as they migrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Lathin family lived in Wiltshire, at the manor of Lattin, from where their name is taken.

Early Origins of the Lathin family

The surname Lathin was first found in Wiltshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Lattin. The family claim to be a junior branch of the Estoutville family of d'Estouteville-en-Caux in Normandy, Governors of the castle of Ambrieres, which branch was part of the senior branch of the family of Roger d'Estouteville, brother of Herluin, founder and first Abbot of Bec, who was reputedly related to the Duke of Normandy. [1]

"William de la Toune occurs in Shropshire during the reign of Edward I. and John de la Doune was Lord of Doune, in that county, in 1316. Ralph de la Thun held land in Woodchurch, Kent, of the King in capite, and died before 1260, 'without heir of his body.' Thomas de Toune, of Throwley, was one of the constables of the Hundred of Faversham during the great Kentish rebellion of 1380." [2]

"John de la Dune, in 1254, held land at Bradewell, in Essex, 'by the serjeancy of carrying one gleyve (gladium) or sword, in the King's army. And, in 1284, Thomas de la Doune, most probably his son, held a tenement in Bradewell by the serjeancy of finding one lance for the King, whenever he should happen to go with an army into Wales.' He died in 1306, leaving an heiress Margaret. Morant suggests that he took his name from Dounhall, his residence ; but it is at least equally likely that his house was named from him. In Surrey, Gregory de la Doune held of William de Windsor at Compton [3]. Sir Roger de la Dune, 'a knight of Middlesex' is mentioned in Staffordshire temp. Henry III. " [2]

The senior branch of the Estoutevilles were granted Lydesdale Castle on the border of England and Scotland, junior sons settled on other estates granted them throughout England. As was customary, second and third sons adopted the surname of the estates. Hence Walter d'Estouteville became Walter Latton of Wiltshire about 1100. Junior branches of this family were, the Lattins of Upton in Berks, Esher in Surrey, and the Morristown Lattins of Kildare in Ireland.

Early History of the Lathin family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Lathin research. Another 139 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1290 and 1172 are included under the topic Early Lathin History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Lathin Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Latton, Lattin, Latin, Lattins, Lattons, Latins, De Latton and many more.

Early Notables of the Lathin family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Lathin Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Lathin family to Ireland

Some of the Lathin family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 122 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Lathin family

Because of the political and religious discontent in England, families began to migrate abroad in enormous numbers. Faced with persecution and starvation at home, the open frontiers and generally less oppressive social environment of the New World seemed tantalizing indeed to many English people. The trip was difficult, and not all made it unscathed, but many of those who did get to Canada and the United States made important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers with Lathin name or one of its variants: John Latin who settled in New York State in 1636.



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)


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