Hubber History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Hubber is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. Hubber is a name that comes from the Norman personal name Hildebert, which is composed of the Germanic elements "hild," which meant "battle" or "strife," and "berht," which meant "bright" or "famous." The Norman Conquerors imported a vast number of Norman French personal names into England, which largely replaced traditional Old English personal names among the upper and middle classes.

Early Origins of the Hubber family

The surname Hubber was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where the early Latin form of the name was found in Hampshire, Eudo filius Huberti. [1]

The family may have descended from Roger and/or Ralph Hubert, who were listed in the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae (1180). [2]

Later on in London, as a forename, Hubert de Bissoppesgate was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of 1292. Thomas Huberd (Hubert) was found in Dorset in the Pipe Rolls of 1230, William Hoberd was in the Feet of Fines for Suffolk in 1292 and Roger Hubard was in the Subsidy Rolls for Somerset in 1327. [3]

Osbert Houbard was also listed in Somerset, Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [4]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 recorded Petrus Hubard; Alicia Hubard; and Isabella Hoberd as all holding lands there at that time. [5]

"Hubbard is a characteristic Norfolk name. The early form of the name in this and the neighbouring counties, both in Domesday times and in the centuries immediately following, was Hubert, occasionally written Huberd; and we find that Robert Hubert or Hoberd was rector of Seaming at the close of the 14th century. Thence, the transition to Hubberd, and on to Hubbard is an easy one. " [6]

The English nursery rhyme "Old Mother Hubbard" is generally attributed to Sarah Catherine Martin (1768-1826), who lived in Yealmpton, Devon and was first published under the title "The Comic Adventures of Old Mother Hubbard and her Dog."

Early History of the Hubber family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hubber research. Another 258 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1190, 1588, 1775, 1783, 1621, 1704, 1757, 1837, 1770, 1849 and 1642 are included under the topic Early Hubber History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hubber Spelling Variations

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Hubert, Hubbert, Hubbard and others.

Early Notables of the Hubber family (pre 1700)

Another 47 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hubber Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hubber family to Ireland

Some of the Hubber family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 49 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Hubber migration to the United States +

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Hubber or a variant listed above were:

Hubber Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Isaac Hubber, who arrived in Maryland in 1659 [7]
Hubber Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Theophilus Hubber, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1751 [7]

Australia Hubber migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Hubber Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Hubber, (b. 1812), aged 37, Cornish labourer from Gwennap, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lysander" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 13th January 1849 [8]
  • Mrs. Blanch Hubber, (b. 1815), aged 34, Cornish settler from Gwennap, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lysander" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 13th January 1849 [8]
  • Miss Elizabeth Hubber, (b. 1837), aged 12, Cornish settler from Gwennap, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lysander" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 13th January 1849 [8]
  • Miss Jane Hubber, (b. 1839), aged 10, Cornish settler from Gwennap, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lysander" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 13th January 1849 [8]
  • Miss Catherine Hubber, (b. 1841), aged 8, Cornish settler from Gwennap, Cornwall, UK travelling aboard the ship "Lysander" arriving in Port Phillip, New South Wales, Australia on 13th January 1849 [8]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Hubber migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Hubber Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Henry Hubber, (b. 1857), aged 21, Cornish farm labourer departing on 29th October 1878 aboard the ship "Western Monarch" going to Bluff or Otago, New Zealand arriving in port on 26th February 1879 [9]
  • Mr. Henry Hubber, (b. 1857), aged 21, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Western Monarch" arriving in New Zealand in 1879 [10]


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, May 30). Ships' Passenger Lists of Arrivals in New South Wales on (1828 - 1842, 1848 - 1849) [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_nsw_1838_on.pdf
  9. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to other ports, 1872 - 84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  10. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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