Hampdant History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The present generation of the Hampdant family is only the most recent to bear a name that dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name comes from having lived in the village of Hampton in the dioceses of Worcester, Hereford, London, Exeter, and Lichford. [1] Another source notes "there are at least thirteen parishes of this name in England, representing the the Dioceses of Worcester, London, Hereford, Oxford, Exeter, and Lichfield." [2]

The family may have originated in Normandy as the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae lists: William de Hantona, Normandy, 1198 and William, Aelis, Gervase, Osbert, Walter de Hantona, Normandy, 1180-98. Alexander, Reiner, Roger, Simon de Hamton, England, 1198. [3]

Early Origins of the Hampdant family

The surname Hampdant was first found in Staffordshire where they were recorded as a family of great antiquity seated at Wolverhampton with manor and estates in that shire. However, the name has three distinct origins: from the Old English word ham-tun as in "home farm, homestead"; from the Old English words hamm + tun, meaning "farmstead in an enclosure or river bend"; and finally from the Old English hean + tun meaning "high farmstead." [4]

The earliest place name found was Hamtona in 716 which later became Hampton Lovett which is now a village and civil parish in the Wychavon district of the county of Worcestershire. The Domesday Book listed the following place names: Hamtune, Hantone, Hamntone Hantune, Hantone and Hantun. [4]

The first record of the family was found in Oxfordshire where the Cartulary of Osney Abbey lists Philip de Hamtona in 1166. Later, Edith de Hampton was listed in the Assize Rolls for Worcestershire in 1221 and Richard Hampton was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1327. [5]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 had quite a few listings of the family: John de Hampton, Somerset; William de Hamptone, Huntingdonshire; Nicholas de Hampton, Wiltshire; Philip de Hampton, Cambridgeshire; and Geoffrey de Hampton, Lincolnshire. [2]

But another source claims the name goes back to Saxon times. "Some Hamptons (e.g. in cos. Hereford and Somerset) occur in charters of the A.- Saxon period as Hamtún and Homtún; others (e.g. in cos. Gloucester and War­wick) as Heámtúne or Heántúne. South­ampton occurs as Hamtún ('æt Hamtúne') in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 837, which gives name to Hampshire. Some Hamptons (e.g. High Hampton, Devonshire, and Hampton-on-the-Hill, Warwickshire) indicate their etymology by later prefixes or suffixes." [6]

In Scotland, the name is "from one of the many Hamptons in England. Bardsley says there are at least thirteen parishes of the name there Rogerus de Hamtone witnessed resignation of the lands of Edeluestun to the church of Glasgow, 1233." [7]

The Hamptons, part of the East End of Long Island in New York are a group of villages and hamlets in the towns of Southampton and East Hampton that collectively date back to the late nineteenth century when the area changed from a farming to a popular destination for the wealthy.

Early History of the Hampdant family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hampdant research. Another 81 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1166, 1221, 1327, 1552, 1625, 1552, 1611, 1611, 1612 and are included under the topic Early Hampdant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hampdant Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Hampdant include Hampton, Hamptonne and others.

Early Notables of the Hampdant family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Christopher Hampton (1552-1625), Archbishop of Armagh, called John in the printed Patent Rolls, was born at Calais in 1552, and was of English descent, educated at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. On the death of Brutus (or Brute) Babington, D.D., Bishop of Derry, he was nominated to that see (Cat. State Papers, Ireland, 1611-14, p. 181)...
Another 62 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hampdant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hampdant family to Ireland

Some of the Hampdant family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 50 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hampdant family

Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Hampdant were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records: Joanne Hampton who settled in Virginia in 1621; with her husband William; Anne Hampton settled in Barbados in 1697; John Hampton settled in Virginia in 1634. In Newfoundland, Robert Hampton was a grand juror of St. John's in 1811.



  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  7. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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