Haltoomb History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The lineage of the name Haltoomb begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It is a result of when they lived in Halton, a very common place-name in England. The place-name is derived from the Old English terms halh, which means nook or corner of land, and tun, which meant farm or enclosure, and later came to mean fortress and town. The name means "farm in the nook or corner of land." The surname denotes a dweller at same. [1]

John of Halton or Halghton (d. 1324), was Bishop of Carlisle, a canon of the Augustinian convent of St. Mary's, Carlisle, which was also the cathedral of the diocese. "In 1295 Halton was sent as an ambassador to King John of Scotland, and on 8 Nov. received a safe-conduct for his return. On 13 Oct. 1297 Halton was appointed custos of Carlisle Castle and of the royal domains. In 1320 Halton went on his last embassy to Scotland, and had his expenses refused by the king on the ground that he went for his own good as well as for that of the realm." [2]

Early Origins of the Haltoomb family

The surname Haltoomb was first found in Halton, the original name of the parish of St. Dominick, Cornwall. "At the time of Doomsday Survey the district was taxed under the appellation of Halton, by which name a manor is still distinguished in this parish. Halton, which gave name originally to this parish, before St. Dominick either honoured or disgraced it with his name, is a manor, that so early as the thirteenth century belonged to an ancient family of this name. In the reign of Edward II. the male heirs becoming extinct, Halton was carried by an heiress to Wendyn, from which family it was carried by another heiress to Whitlegh, who was sheriff of Devon in the reign of Richard II. and whose grandson was sheriff of that county under Henry VII." [3]

Early History of the Haltoomb family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haltoomb research. Another 70 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1084, 1628, 1699, 1632, 1704 and 1677 are included under the topic Early Haltoomb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Haltoomb Spelling Variations

Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Haltoomb has undergone many spelling variations, including Halton, Haltone, Hultahan, Haltom, Haltum and others.

Early Notables of the Haltoomb family (pre 1700)

Another 43 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haltoomb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Haltoomb family to Ireland

Some of the Haltoomb family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Haltoomb family

To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Haltoomb were among those contributors: James Haltone who arrived in Philadelphia in 1853; James Halton arrived in Maryland in 1775; John Halton arrived in Potomack in 1747.



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  3. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print


Houseofnames.com on Facebook