Blunt History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient Norman culture that was established in England after the Conquest of 1066 produced the name of Blunt. It was given to a person with blond hair having derived from the Anglo-Norman French word blunt, which means blond.

Early Origins of the Blunt family

The surname Blunt was first found in Suffolk where the Blounts or Blunts, as they are more modernly called, trace their heritage to the Normans, specifically to Rudolph, Count of Guisnes, who nobly assisted Duke William of Normandy to conquer the Saxons at Hastings, in 1066. Sir Robert de Blount (c.1029-1066) had command of the Conqueror's ships during the invasion and was amply rewarded. Sir William, his brother, commanded his foot soldiers at Hastings.

These two great nobles received lands in Suffolk, Sir Robert became Baron of Ixworth, Lord of Orford Castle, and Sir William got seven lordships at Saxlingham in the county of Sussex. Each of these branches flourished and there is a record of each succeeding Baron in each estate. Both are recorded in the Domesday Book with their various properties.

John de Blund or Blunt (c. 1175-1248), Chancellor of York, was one of the leaders of the movement for the restoration of the university of Oxford to its ancient position as a seat of learning. He was Archbishop of Canterbury-elect in 1232. [1]

Later, Robert de Houton was rector of the church of St. Elphin, Warrington, Lancashire and was confirmed the 3rd of April 1330. [2]

Early History of the Blunt family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blunt research. Another 197 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1600, 1640, 1400, 1403, 1493, 1502, 1540, 1597, 1666, 1617, 1563, 1606, 1654, 1693, 1618, 1679, 1565, 1632, 1529, 1597, 1594, 1654, 1624, 1654, 1693, 1601, 1604, 1618, 1679, 1649, 1697, 1670, 1731, 1580 and 1563 are included under the topic Early Blunt History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blunt Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Blount, Blunt, Blond, Blonde, Blund and others.

Early Notables of the Blunt family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Thomas Blount (d. 1400), supporter of Richard II; Sir Walter Blount (died 1403), soldier and supporter of John of Gaunt (Duke of Lancaster), served as the royal standard bearer, mistaken for the king and killed in combat, appears as a character in Shakespeare's play Henry IV, part 1; Sir James Blount (d. 1493), English commander of the fortress of Hammes; Elizabeth Blount (1502-1540), mistress of Henry VIII; Mountjoy Blount, 1st Earl of Newport (c. 1597-1666), created Baron Mountjoy in the Irish peerage (1617); Charles Blount (1563-1606), English Earl of Devonshire; Charles Blount...
Another 162 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blunt Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Blunt family to Ireland

Some of the Blunt family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blunt migration to the United States +

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Blunt or a variant listed above:

Blunt Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Blunt, who settled in Virginia in 1652
  • Gilbert Blunt, who landed in Virginia in 1652 [3]
  • Jon Blunt, who landed in Virginia in 1652 [3]
  • Edward Blunt, who arrived in Virginia in 1653 [3]
  • Thomas Blunt, who landed in Virginia in 1653 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Blunt Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Blunt, who arrived in Virginia in 1701 [3]
  • Jahn Blunt, who landed in Virginia in 1716 [3]
  • Henrich Blunt, who landed in New York, NY in 1782 [3]
Blunt Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Hannah, Joseph, Mary, Melliant, Phoebe, Samuel, Sara and William Blunt, all, who arrived in New York in 1820
  • Basheba Blunt, who landed in Texas in 1835 [3]
  • Bathsheba Blunt, who arrived in Texas in 1835 [3]
  • Benjm Blunt, aged 30, who landed in Key West, Fla in 1838 [3]
  • George Blunt, who landed in Missouri in 1839 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Blunt migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Blunt Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Isaac Blunt, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1760

Australia Blunt migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Blunt Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Job Blunt, English convict from Northampton, who was transported aboard the "Andromeda" on November 13, 1832, settling in New South Wales, Australia [4]
  • Thomas Blunt, English convict from Northampton, who was transported aboard the "Andromeda" on November 13, 1832, settling in New South Wales, Australia [4]
  • Lydia Blunt, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Katherine Stewart Forbes" in 1839 [5]
  • Julia Blunt, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Katherine Stewart Forbes" in 1839 [5]
  • James Love Blunt, aged 27, a bricklayer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Caroline" [6]

New Zealand Blunt migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Blunt Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Blunt, (b. 1862), aged Infant, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • Mr. William Blunt, (b. 1822), aged 40, British labourer travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • Mrs. Anne Blunt, (b. 1825), aged 37, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • Miss Mary A. Blunt, (b. 1851), aged 11, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • Mr. Tom Blunt, (b. 1852), aged 10, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Echunga" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 24th December 1862 [7]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Blunt (post 1700) +

  • Herschel Leroy Blunt (1921-2016), American politician, Member of the Missouri House of Representatives (1979-1986)
  • Roy D. Blunt (b. 1950), American Republican politician, Secretary of State of Missouri, 1985-93; President, Southwest Baptist University, 1993-96.; U.S. Representative from Missouri 7th District, 1997- [8]
  • Roscoe Blunt, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New York, 1984 [8]
  • Raymond S. Blunt Sr., American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Illinois, 1956 [8]
  • Matthew Roy Blunt (b. 1970), American Republican politician, Member of Missouri State House of Representatives 139th District, 1999-2000; Secretary of State of Missouri, 2001-05; Governor of Missouri, 2005- [8]
  • John H. Blunt, American Republican politician, Postmaster at Ashland, Virginia, 1889-94 [8]
  • Jeffrey Charles Blunt, American Libertarian politician, Candidate for Texas State House of Representatives 125th District, 2006, 2010 [8]
  • G. W. Blunt, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1856 [8]
  • Edward O. Blunt, American politician, Member of New Hampshire State Senate 17th District, 1887-88 [8]
  • C. Harry Blunt, American politician, Mayor of Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1952-55 [8]
  • ... (Another 14 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMS Hood
  • Mr. William H T Blunt (b. 1923), Welsh Leading Cook (S) serving for the Royal Navy from Newport, Monmouthshire, Wales, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [9]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Walter Terence Blunt, British Pay Lieutenant, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [10]
  • Mr. John Irvin Blunt, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [10]


The Blunt Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Lux Tua, via mea
Motto Translation: Thy light is my way.


Suggested Readings for the name Blunt +

  • 3995 "Reminiscences and Memoirs of North Carolina and Eminent North Carolinians; An Extract: Genealogy of the Blount (also Blunt), Haywood and Phifer Families" by John Hill Wheeler, "Parker and Blount (also Blunt) in Florida" by Virginia Westergard.

  1. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  2. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  3. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  4. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 27) Andromeda voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1832 with 186 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/andromeda/1832
  5. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) KATHERINE STEWART FORBES 1837 arrived Holdfast Bay, near Adelaide, on October 17, 1837. . Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1837KatherineStewartForbes.htm
  6. ^ South Australian Register Thursday 26th April 1855. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Caroline 1855. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/caroline1855.shtml
  7. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  8. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  9. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  10. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html


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