Blend History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The proud Norman name of Blend was developed in England soon after Norman Conquest of England in 1066. It was name for a person with blond hair having derived from the Anglo-Norman French word blunt, which means blond. [1]

Early Origins of the Blend family

The surname Blend was first found in Suffolk where the Blounts or Blunts, as they are more modernly called, trace their heritage to the Normans, specifically to Rudolph, Count of Guisnes, who nobly assisted Duke William of Normandy to conquer the Saxons at Hastings, in 1066. Sir Robert de Blount (c.1029-1066) had command of the Conqueror's ships during the invasion and was amply rewarded. Sir William, his brother, commanded his foot soldiers at Hastings. [2]

These two great nobles received lands in Suffolk, Sir Robert became Baron of Ixworth, Lord of Orford Castle, and Sir William got seven lordships at Saxlingham in the county of Sussex. Each of these branches flourished and there is a record of each succeeding Baron in each estate. Both are recorded in the Domesday Book with their various properties. [3]

John de Blund or Blunt (c. 1175-1248), Chancellor of York, was one of the leaders of the movement for the restoration of the university of Oxford to its ancient position as a seat of learning. He was Archbishop of Canterbury-elect in 1232. [4]

In Scotland, the name is more often than not a variant of Blund. John le Blunt of Eskeby from Dumfriesshire, rendered homage to King Edward I of England in 1296. Interestingly, Hugh de Abirbuthenoth, who gifted the church of Garuoch to the monastery of Arnbroath in 1292, was commonly designated Hugo Blundus or Le Blond, from the flaxen color of his hair. However, the first record in Scotland was sometime before 1200 when Rodbert Blundus witnessed a charier by Roger de Quenci. Later Adam Blundus witnessed a confirmation charter by the Chapter of Brechin c. 1212-1218. John Blund who witnessed a charter by Matilda, countess of Angus, c. 1242-1248 is probably the John Blundus who appears as a charter witness in Brechin in 1267. [5]

Back in England, the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 included listings of: Melodia le Blount, Huntingdonshire; Margareta le Blound, Cambridgeshire; Richard le Blont, Wiltshire; Alan le Blund, Oxfordshire; and Richard le Blunt, Wiltshire. [6]

Ascelina le Blund, or Blunt was listed in Norfolk in 1272 [7] and John le Blont, was listed in Somerset, 1 Edward III (during the first year of Edward III's reign.) [8] The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included: Johannes Blont; and Ricardus Blont. [6]

Later, Robert de Houton was rector of the church of St. Elphin, Warrington, Lancashire and was confirmed the 3rd of April 1330. [9]

Early History of the Blend family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blend research. Another 197 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1600, 1640, 1400, 1403, 1493, 1502, 1540, 1597, 1666, 1617, 1563, 1606, 1654, 1693, 1618, 1679, 1565, 1632, 1529, 1597, 1594, 1654, 1624, 1654, 1693, 1601, 1604, 1618, 1679, 1649, 1697, 1670, 1731, 1580 and 1563 are included under the topic Early Blend History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blend Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Blend have been found, including Blount, Blunt, Blond, Blonde, Blund and others.

Early Notables of the Blend family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Thomas Blount (d. 1400), supporter of Richard II; Sir Walter Blount (died 1403), soldier and supporter of John of Gaunt (Duke of Lancaster), served as the royal standard bearer, mistaken for the king and killed in combat, appears as a character in Shakespeare's play Henry IV, part 1; Sir James Blount (d. 1493), English commander of the fortress of Hammes; Elizabeth Blount (1502-1540), mistress of Henry VIII; Mountjoy Blount, 1st Earl of Newport (c. 1597-1666), created Baron Mountjoy in the Irish peerage (1617); Charles Blount (1563-1606), English Earl of Devonshire; Charles Blount...
Another 162 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blend Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Blend family to Ireland

Some of the Blend family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blend migration to the United States +

For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Blend were among those contributors:

Blend Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Blend, who arrived in Virginia in 1646 [10]
Blend Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Wolfgang Blend, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1856 [10]

Contemporary Notables of the name Blend (post 1700) +


    RMS Lusitania


    The Blend Motto +

    The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

    Motto: Lux Tua, via mea
    Motto Translation: Thy light is my way.


    1. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Print
    2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
    3. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 1 of 3
    4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
    5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
    6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
    7. ^ Rye, Walter, A History of Norfolk. London: Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster Row, 1885. Print
    8. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
    9. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
    10. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
    11. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/


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