Barker History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The saga of the name Barker follows a line reaching back through history to the days of the Anglo-Saxon tribes in Britain. It was a name for someone who worked as a person who stripped trees of bark for tanning. "It is confined to the northern half of England and to the eastern counties north of the Thames. It is very frequent in Yorkshire, and is also well represented in the counties of Derby, Lincoln, and Norfolk." [1]

The name evolved from "from the trade or occupation of 'barker,' an obsolete name for the bark-stripper or rather for the man who prepared the bark for the tanner. Later the word was synonymous with 'tanner.' " [2]

"A tanner, from his using bark of trees in his trade. In the old ballad of the King and the Tanner in Percy's Reliques, the latter calls himself "a Barker, Sir, by my trade." English Sum. Barcarius and Le Barkere." [3]

Early Origins of the Barker family

The surname Barker was first found in Yorkshire where Ralph Berker was a Knights Templar in 1185. A few years later, Aluredus le berkier was found the in the Pipe Rolls for Lincolnshire in 1193. Later again, John le Bercher was recorded in the Curia Regis Rolls for Hampshire in 1212. Jordan le Barker was found in the Assize Rolls for Essex in 1255 and John le Barker was listed in the Assize Rolls for Cambridgeshire in 1260. [4] The previous entries that include "le", meaning "the", point the the occupational nature of the name as by example, "John the Barker."

Another source notes, Alan le Barkere who was listed there in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. The same rolls listed Robert Barcarius in Lincolnshire. [5]

Early records in Scotland include: "Patrick Bercar and his son [who] held land in Dunipace c. 1200. Alisaundre le Barker, provost of the burgh of Haddington, rendered homage in 1296 [to King Edward I of England]. Richard le Barker of Tyningham, tenant of the bishop of St. Andrews in the county of Edneburk also rendered homage in the same year. Thomas Barkar in the parish of Fyvy was excommunicated in 1382, William Barcar held a land in Edinburgh in 1400, and Alexander Barcare was vicar of the parish of Pettinain in 1486." [2]

Early History of the Barker family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barker research. Another 317 words (23 lines of text) covering the years 1273, 1577, 1600, 1619, 1652, 1700, 1722, 1734, 1774, 1788, 1804, 1806, 1808, 1809, 1609, 1652, 1635, 1664, 1655, 1696, 1680, 1696, 1685, 1731, 1708, 1715, 1722, 1619, 1698, 1623, 1702, 1678, 1679, 1739, 1749 and 1793 are included under the topic Early Barker History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barker Spelling Variations

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Barker were recorded, including Barker, Barkers, Barkes, Barkess, Barkere, Barkar and others.

Early Notables of the Barker family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Sir Christopher Barker, a distinguished British diplomat and court official in the 16th century; Sir John Barker, 1st Baronet (c.1609-c. 1652); and his son, Sir John Barker, 2nd Baronet (c.1635-1664); and his son, Sir John Barker, 4th Baronet (1655-1696), an English Baronet and politician, Member of Parliament for Ipswich (1680-1696); and his son, Sir William...
Another 60 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barker Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barker World Ranking

In the United States, the name Barker is the 316th most popular surname with an estimated 87,045 people with that name. [6] However, in Canada, the name Barker is ranked the 443rd most popular surname with an estimated 10,684 people with that name. [7] And in Newfoundland, Canada, the name Barker is the 708th popular surname with an estimated 61 people with that name. [8] Australia ranks Barker as 158th with 18,944 people. [9] New Zealand ranks Barker as 159th with 3,211 people. [10] The United Kingdom ranks Barker as 99th with 48,588 people. [11]

Ireland Migration of the Barker family to Ireland

Some of the Barker family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Barker migration to the United States +

To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Barker family emigrate to North America:

Barker Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Elizabeth Barker, who arrived in America in 1620 [12]
  • Stephen Barker, who arrived in Virginia in 1624 [12]
  • Edmund Barker, who sailed to Maine in 1625
  • Francis Barker, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [12]
  • Laurence Barker, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [12]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barker Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Charles Barker, who arrived in South Carolina in 1702 [12]
  • Roger Barker, who arrived in Virginia in 1704 [12]
  • Sarah Barker, who arrived in South Carolina in 1707 [12]
  • John Barker, who arrived in South Carolina in 1707 [12]
  • Jury Barker, who arrived in Charlestown, Massachusetts in 1709 [12]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barker Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Barker, who arrived in Mobile, Ala in 1821 [12]
  • George Barker to Boston in 1822
  • William G Barker, who landed in New York in 1833 [12]
  • Marmaduke Barker, who landed in New York in 1834 [12]
  • Robert Barker, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1837 [12]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barker Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Mr. Sydney Barker, (b. 1901), aged 1 year 8 months, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "New York" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 14th June 1903 en route to Wardner, Idaho, USA [13]
  • Mrs. Janie Barker, (b. 1875), aged 28, Cornish settler travelling aboard the ship "New York" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 14th June 1903 en route to Wardner, Idaho, USA [13]
  • Mr. William Arthur Barker, (b. 1882), aged 23, Cornish blacksmith travelling aboard the ship "St Louis" arriving at Ellis Island, New York on 16th April 1905 en route to Buffalo, New York, USA [13]

Canada Barker migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Barker Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Abijah Barker U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 [14]
  • Mr. Asa Barker U.E. who settled in New Brunswick c. 1783 he was a member of the Cape Ann Association [14]
  • Mr. Ephraim Barker U.E. born in Maine, USA who settled in New Brunswick c. 1783 he was a member of the Cape Ann Association [14]
  • Mr. John Barker U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 [14]
  • Mr. Thomas Barker U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 [14]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Barker Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Charles Barker, aged 38, a farmer, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Henry Benjamin Barker, aged 26, a farmer, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Elenor Barker, aged 23, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Henry Barker, aged 3, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Edward Barker, aged 4 months, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Barker migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Barker Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Frederick Barker, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Almorah" on April 1817, settling in New South Wales, Australia [15]
  • William Barker, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Almorah" on April 1817, settling in New South Wales, Australia [15]
  • James Barker, English convict from York, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on July 29th, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [16]
  • William Barker, English convict from Staffordshire, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on May 17, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [17]
  • Jonah Barker, a sawyer, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Barker migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Barker Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mrs. Barker, Australian settler travelling from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia aboard the ship "Bee" arriving in New Zealand in 1832 [18]
  • James Barker, aged 33, a farm labourer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Mary Barker, aged 29, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Mary Ann Barker, aged 10, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • Elizabeth Barker, aged 3, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1841
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Barker migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [19]
Barker Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Alice Barker, who landed in St Christopher in 1635 [12]
  • Mary Barker, who landed in St Christopher in 1635 [12]
  • Miss Mary Barker, (b. 1623), aged 12, British settler traveling aboard the ship "Matthew" arriving in St Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635 [20]
  • Elizabeth Barker to Barbados in 1669
Barker Settlers in West Indies in the 18th Century
  • Robert Barker to Jamaica in 1761

Contemporary Notables of the name Barker (post 1700) +

  • Lucius Jefferson Barker (1928-2020), American political scientist from Franklinton, Louisiana
  • Raymond Herrell "Buddy" Barker (1936-2018), American Major League Baseball first baseman who played for the Baltimore Orioles (1960), Cleveland Indians (1965) and the New York Yankees (1965–1967)
  • Lois Anna "Tommie" Barker (1923-2018), American utility player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from Dover, New Jersey; she played for the Grand Rapids Chicks in 1950
  • Robert "Bob" Barker (b. 1923), American television game show host, known for hosting CBS's The Price Is Right from 1972 to 2007
  • Major-General Ray Wehnes Barker (1889-1974), American Commanding General 78th Division, North-West Europe (1945-1946) [21]
  • Major-General John DeForrest Barker (1897-1986), American Acting Commanding Officer of the Air University, Maxwell AFB, Alabama (1953) [22]
  • Brigadier-General Harold Richards Barker (1891-1965), American Commanding Officer, 68th Field Artillery Brigade (1937-1942) [23]
  • George Barker (1882-1965), American portrait and landscape painter
  • Alexander Barker, American Democratic Party politician, Member of Arizona State House of Representatives, 1912-13 [24]
  • Abraham Andrews Barker (1816-1898), American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1860; U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 17th District, 1865-67 [24]
  • ... (Another 144 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. John  Barker (1911-1917), Canadian resident from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [25]
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Benjamin Joseph Herbert Barker (1920-1941), Australian Able Seaman from Perth, Western Australia, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [26]
HMS Dorsetshire
  • Clifford Barker (d. 1945), British Shipwright 4th Class aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk; he died in the sinking [27]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Thomas Barker (b. 1917), Scottish Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [28]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Joseph Barker, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [29]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Edward Hutchinson Barker (1915-1939), born in Slamannan, Stirlingshire, Scotland, Scottish Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [30]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mrs. Martha Ann Barker, (née Bullock), American 2nd Class passenger from Trenton, New Jersey, USA, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [31]
  • Miss Winifred Barker, American 2nd Class passenger from Trenton, New Jersey, USA, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [31]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Albert Vale Barker (d. 1912), aged 19, English Assistant Baker from Winchester, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [32]
  • Mr. Ernest T. Barker (d. 1912), aged 37, English First Class Saloon Steward from London, England who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [32]
  • Mr. Reginald Lomond Barker (d. 1912), aged 40, English Assistant Purser from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [32]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Loren Joe Barker, American Coxswain from Iowa, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [33]


The Barker Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fide sed cui vide
Motto Translation: Trust, but in whom take care.


Suggested Readings for the name Barker +

  • Barker-Harland: A Genealogical Study by Marjorie Harland Barker Diedrich.
  • Odyssey of the Barkers and the Russells by Don W. Barker.
  • West, Barker, Hodges: New York to Wisconsin, 1836-1846 by Beatrice West Seitz.

  1. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  7. ^ https://forebears.io/surnames/
  8. ^ The order of Common Surnames in 1955 in Newfoundland retrieved on 20th October 2021 (retrieved from Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland by E.R. Seary corrected edition ISBN 0-7735-1782-0)
  9. ^ https://forebears.io/australia/surnames
  10. ^ https://forebears.io/new-zealand/surnames
  11. ^ https://www.surnamemap.eu/unitedkingdom/surnames_ranking.php?p=10
  12. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  13. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retreived 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_ellis_island_1892_on.pdf
  14. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  15. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Almorah voyage to New South Wales, Australia in 1817 with 180 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/almorah/1817
  16. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1823 with 151 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1823
  17. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1823 with 200 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1823
  18. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  19. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  20. ^ Pilgrim Ship's of 1600's (Retrieved October 4th 2021, retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  21. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, October 6) Ray Barker. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Barker/Ray_Wehnes/USA.html
  22. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, October 6) John Barker. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Barker/John_DeForrest/USA.html
  23. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, October 6) Harold Barker. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Barker/Harold_Richards/USA.html
  24. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  25. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  26. ^ HMAS Sydney II, Finding Sydney Foundation - Roll of Honour. (Retrieved 2014, April 24) . Retrieved from http://www.findingsydney.com/roll.asp
  27. ^ Force Z Survivors HMS Dorsetshire Crew List, (Retrieved 2018, February 13th), https://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listdorsetshirecrew.html
  28. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  29. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html
  30. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html
  31. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/
  32. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html
  33. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


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