Blake History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

As a name, Blake was often interchangeable with Black in early times. Both names are thought to be derived from Old English words such as "bloec" or "blac," which meant "black," or from the Old English "blac," which surprisingly could mean "pale." Early forms of the surname Black have existed in Britain since the 10th century.

Early Origins of the Blake family

The surname Blake was first found in Devon where they held a family seat from very ancient times, and Walter le Blake was recorded in the Pipe Rolls for the region in 1167. However some of the family moved far north to Twizell in Northumberland, about 10 miles from Berwick. "Twizell Castle, a fine though unfinished castellated mansion of the Blakes, is seated on a rocky precipice, surrounded by extremely picturesque scenery; and near it is Tillmouth House, the present residence of the family." [1]

"Blake is a south of England name, found most frequently in Wiltshire, Cornwall, Berkshire, and Oxfordshire. Amongst the old established Wiltshire families I may refer to that of Blake, which is at present best represented around Chippenham. There were Blakes in Warminster in the reign of Elizabeth, and they are still to be found there, and the name has been represented in Ludgershall since the beginning of the 17th century " [2]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list: Hamo le Blake in Buckinghamshire; Reginald le Blake in Cambridgeshire; Reyner le Blake in Norfolk; and Edericke le Blacke in Lincolnshire. [3]

Kirby's Quest lists: "William le Blake, Somerset, 1 Edward III." [4] (William le Blake helds lands in Somerset during the first year's reign of Edward III.)

Further to the north in Scotland, early records there revealed Luce Blake was tenant of land in Waldefgate, Berwick, c. 1266 and Atkyn Blake was a charter witness in Ayr c. 1340. [5]

Early History of the Blake family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Blake research. Another 131 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1219, 1273, 1266, 1340, 1627, 1536, 1709, 1780, 1774, 1772, 1559, 1657, 1597, 1657, 1598, 1657, 1700, 1694, 1695, 1698, 1701, 1702, 1757, 1827, 1185 and are included under the topic Early Blake History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Blake Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Blake include Blake, Blaik and others.

Early Notables of the Blake family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Admiral Robert Blake (1559-1657), born in Bridgewater, considered the greatest English admiral after Nelson; Thomas Blake (c.1597-1657), an English clergyman and controversialist; Robert Blake (1598-1657), one of the most important military commanders of the Commonwealth of England, one of the most famous...
Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Blake Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Blake family to Ireland

Some of the Blake family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 142 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Blake migration to the United States +

Searching for a better life, many English families migrated to British colonies. Unfortunately, the majority of them traveled under extremely harsh conditions: overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the ocean. For those families that arrived safely, modest prosperity was attainable, and many went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the new colonies. Research into the origins of individual families in North America revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Blake or a variant listed above:

Blake Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Walter Blake, who arrived in Virginia in 1624 [6]
  • William Blake who came from Essex, England, sailed on the "Mary and John" in 1630 and settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts
  • George Blake, who settled in Gloucester in 1640
  • John Blake, who arrived in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1642 [6]
  • Giles Blake, who arrived in Maryland in 1650 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Blake Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Charles Blake, who landed in Virginia in 1702 [6]
  • Robert Blake, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [6]
  • Cha Blake, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [6]
  • Jane Blake, who arrived in New England in 1740 [6]
  • John Garrett Blake was a JP of Trinity in 1753
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Blake Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Bryan Blake, who landed in Antigua (Antego) in 1801 [6]
  • John Blake, who settled in Middletown, Connecticut
  • Ellen Blake, aged 35, who landed in America in 1822 [6]
  • Daniel Blake, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1827 [6]
  • Matthew Blake, who landed in Maine in 1829 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Blake migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Blake Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • William Blake, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • William Blake, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • John Blake, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
  • Iona Blake, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750
Blake Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Philip Blake, from Wexford, Ireland was married in St. John's, Newfoundland in 1804 [7]
  • Thomas Blake, a planter of Herring Neck, Newfoundland in 1820 [7]
  • Theophilus Blake, who landed in Canada in 1831
  • John Blake, aged 28, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig "Thomas Hanford" from Cork, Ireland
  • Ellen Blake, aged 22, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "Providence" from Cork, Ireland
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Australia Blake migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Blake Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Samuel Blake, (b. 1773), aged 44 born in Launceston, Cornwall, UK convicted in Bodmin on 4th August 1817, sentenced for 14 years for stealing woolen, transported aboard the ship "Globe" in 1818 to Van Diemen's Land, Tasmania, Australia [8]
  • Mr. Samuel Blake (b. 1787), aged 44, Cornish settler convicted in Cornwall, UK on 4th August 1817, sentenced for 14 years for stealing woollen, transported aboard the ship "Globe" in September 1818 to Australia [9]
  • John Blake, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia [10]
  • John Blake, British convict from Jamaica, who was transported aboard the "Argyle" on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [11]
  • Mr. Seymour Blake, British Convict who was convicted in Chatham, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asia" on 20th July 1837, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [12]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Blake migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Blake Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Richard Blake, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Richard Blake, aged 25, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Catherine Stewart Forbes" in 1841
  • Elizabeth Matilda Blake, aged 22, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Catherine Stewart Forbes" in 1841
  • Richard Blake, aged 2, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Catherine Stewart Forbes" in 1841
  • George Blake, aged 38, a grocer, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Slains Castle" in 1841
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Blake (post 1700) +

  • James Hubert "Eubie" Blake (1887-1983), American composer, lyricist, and pianist of ragtime, jazz, and popular music and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom
  • Robert Orris Blake (1921-2015), American diplomat, United States Ambassador to Mali from 1970 to 1973
  • Michael Lennox Blake (1945-2015), American Academy Award and Golden Globe Award winning author, best known for the film adaptation of his novel Dances with Wolves
  • Arthur Blake (1872-1944), American one time silver Olympic medalist for athletics during the 1896 games
  • Marty Blake (1927-2013), American basketball executive, GM of Atlanta Hawks (1954–1970), NBA Director of Scouting (1976–2011)
  • William Burdine Blake Sr. (1852-1938), American music composer and newspaper publisher
  • Lieutenant General Gordon Aylesworth Blake (1910-1997), American Air Force Officer who served from 1962-1965 as director of the National Security Agency
  • Francis Blake (1850-1913), American inventor of a telephone transmitter
  • Eugene Carson Blake (1906-1985), American Clergyman, general secretary of the World Council of Churches
  • Lillie Devereaux Blake (1835-1913), American author and reformer, known for her efforts in the women's suffrage and economic rights movements
  • ... (Another 10 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

HMAS Sydney II
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Harold G Blake (b. 1909), English Leading Stoker serving for the Royal Navy from Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Leslie John Blake, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [15]
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. William L Blake, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [16]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Maurice Blake, British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he survived the sinking [17]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Percival Albert Blake, aged 22, English Trimmer from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking escaping on life boat 15 [18]
  • Mr. Seaton Blake (d. 1912), aged 26, English Mess Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Thomas Henry Blake (d. 1912), aged 36, English Fireman/Stoker from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [18]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. James Monroe Blake, American Fireman Second Class from Missouri, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [19]


Suggested Readings for the name Blake +

  • 420 "The Blake-Ambrose Family History" by Irma Ruth M. Anderson, "The Blaikes of Bibb County, Alabama,1819-1988" by Chester Rankin Johnson Jr.

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  8. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/tasmanian_convicts_cornish.pdf
  9. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 30th May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_convicts.pdf
  10. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1820 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1820
  11. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Argyle voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1831 with 251 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/argyle/1831
  12. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th February 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1837
  13. ^ HMAS Sydney II, Finding Sydney Foundation - Roll of Honour. (Retrieved 2014, April 24) . Retrieved from http://www.findingsydney.com/roll.asp
  14. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  15. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html
  16. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html
  17. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html
  18. ^ Titanic Passenger List - Titanic Facts. (Retrieved 2016, July 13) . Retrieved from http://www.titanicfacts.net/titanic-passenger-list.html
  19. ^ Pearl Harbour: USS Arizona Casualties List Pearl Harbour December 7, 1941. (Retrieved 2018, July 31st). Retrieved from http://pearl-harbor.com/arizona/casualtylist.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate