Tolar History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Tolar is a name that was formed by the Anglo-Saxon society of old Britain. The name was thought to have been used for someone who once worked as a person charged with the duty of collecting taxes. The surname Tolar is derived from the Old English word tollere, which means tax-gatherer. [1]

We must take a moment to explore the origin of the Coat of Arms. And to do so, we provide this interesting quotation: "I turned to Anselme's great work on the peers and nobles of France, in hopes of finding, under his account of the Sovereign Counts of Toulouse, some reference to works which might enable me to pursue the inquiry. The volume was accordingly opened which contains the history of the Counts of Toulouse, when, to my extreme astonishment, I recognized the arms of the English Tolers or Towlers at the head of the history of that great house. Their arms were the hereditary emblems of that almost kingly race in all its branches—the well-known 'Cross of Toulouse' being a cross fleury voided (i.e. in skeleton), which Enghsh heralds had described as a cross fleury surmounted by another cross. Of course all these various families of Toler, Toller, and others, bearing the Cross of Toulouse, were identified as one in origin, and as, no doubt, descendants of the princely house whose name and arms they have borne from the eleventh century." [2]

Early Origins of the Tolar family

The surname Tolar was first found in Cornwall and West Dorset where the name was derived from the River Toller (now named River Hooke.) Locals Toller Whelme, Toller Fratrum, and Toller Porcorum can still be found in this county today. Collectivelly, they date date back to the Domesday Survey when they were listed as Tolre. [3] "Toller is an old Celtic river-name meaning 'hollow stream.'" [4]

However, the first record of the family was found in Lincolnshire where Robert Toller was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1199. Later, William and John Tollere were found in the Assize Rolls of Yorkshire in 1251 and 1255. [5]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included: Willelmus Toller; and Robertus Toller as both holding lands there at that time. [6]

To the north in Scotland, "Hugh Toller, Ambrose Toller, and Nicholas Toller witnessed sale of land in Glasgow, c. 1280-1290. Elene Tollare, wife of Willelmus Dubrelle in Inverkethine, is on record in 1392." [7]

Early History of the Tolar family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tolar research. Another 87 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1428, 1602, 1761, 1732, 1795, 1821, 1692, 1800 and 1827 are included under the topic Early Tolar History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Tolar Spelling Variations

Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of Tolar include Toler, Tolar, Toller, Tollers, Tolers, Towler and many more.

Early Notables of the Tolar family (pre 1700)

Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Tolar Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Tolar Ranking

In the United States, the name Tolar is the 11,137th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [8]

Ireland Migration of the Tolar family to Ireland

Some of the Tolar family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 153 words (11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Tolar family

Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The Tolar were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records: Marie Toller who settled in New England in 1635; Daniel Toller settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1802; Daniel Towler settled in Philadelphia in 1854.


Contemporary Notables of the name Tolar (post 1700) +

  • Thomas Tolar, American politician, Mayor of Weatherford, Texas, 1863-67 [9]
  • Clarence E. Tolar, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Mississippi, 1960 [9]
  • Charlie Tolar (1937-2003), American Football League star who played for the Houston Oilers (1960-1966)
  • Kevin Anthony Tolar (b. 1971), American former Major League Baseball pitcher from Panama City, Florida
  • John Needham Tolar, American lawyer


The Tolar Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Regi et patriæ fidelis
Motto Translation: Faithful to king and law.


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  8. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  9. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, October 21) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook