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Sticklyn is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Sticklyn family lived in Westmorland, at Stirkland.

Early Origins of the Sticklyn family


The surname Sticklyn was first found in Westmorland at Great Strickland or Little Strickland which dates back to the 12th century when it was named Stircland. The name is derived from the Old English words "stirc" + "land" and meant "cultivated land where young bullocks are kept." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Strickland-Ketel and Strickland-Roger were located in the same county. "Descended from Walter de Stirkland, Knight, so called from the pasture-ground of the young cattle, called stirks or steers, in the parish of Morland, in this county; who was living in the reign of Henry III." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
However, some of the family branched to Wintringham in East Riding of Yorkshire in early times. "This parish is situated on the river Derwent, and comprises 8480 acres, of which 5740 are in the township, and, with the exception of the large farm of Linton, exclusively the property of Sir George Strickland, Bart., who is lord of the manor. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Sir George Strickland: the church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a tall and graceful spire." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Early History of the Sticklyn family

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Early History of the Sticklyn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sticklyn research.
Another 245 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1200, 1400, 1415, 1600, 1671, 1621, 1694, 1419, 1400, 1419, 1598, 1596, 1673, 1665, 1724, 1686, 1735, 1640, 1717, 1685 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Sticklyn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sticklyn Spelling Variations

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Sticklyn Spelling Variations


Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Strickland, Stirkland, Stickland and others.

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Early Notables of the Sticklyn family (pre 1700)

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Early Notables of the Sticklyn family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Walter Strickland of Sizergh Hall; Sir Robert Strickland of Sizergh (1600-1671), an English Member of Parliament for Westmorland; Sir Thomas Strickland of Sizergh (1621-1694), supporter of the Royalist cause in the English Civil War; William Strickland (died 1419), an English priest, Bishop...
Another 80 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sticklyn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Sticklyn family to the New World and Oceana

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Migration of the Sticklyn family to the New World and Oceana


Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, travelling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Sticklyn or a variant listed above: Henry Strickland, who settled in Virginia in 1670; along with Joseph; Henry Strickland, who settled in New Jersey in 1769; Hugh Strickland, who settled in Wilmington, Del. in 1789.

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The Sticklyn Motto

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The Sticklyn Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sans mal
Motto Translation: Without evil.


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Sticklyn Family Crest Products

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Sticklyn Family Crest Products



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See Also

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See Also



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Citations

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Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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