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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016

Where did the English Stambaugh family come from? What is the English Stambaugh family crest and coat of arms? When did the Stambaugh family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Stambaugh family history?

The history of the name Stambaugh begins with the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is derived from Hamon, an Old French personal name brought to England after the Norman Conquest in 1066.

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The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Stambaugh has been recorded under many different variations, including Hammond, Hammon, Hammons, Hamon, Hamond and others.

First found in Kent. The Roll of Battle Abbey reveals that two brothers, sons or grandsons of Hamon Dentatus accompanied the Conqueror in his Conquest. The first was Robert Fitz-Hamon, the renowned Conqueror of Glamorganshire and the second was Haimon, named in the Domesday Book as "Dapifer," for having received the office of Lord Steward for the King. The latter died issueless while the former had four daughters, three of which had conventual lives. The remaining daughter named Mabel married Robert Fitzroy, Earl of Gloucester. Hamon Dentatus had two other sons: Richard of Granville; and Creuquer who inherited the Barony of Chatham from Robert Fitz-Hamon and many of the Kentish estates of Hamon Dapifer. [1] These estates were passed down to Haimon de Crévequer (died 1208) who had one son Robert Haimon. The latter joined the confederacy of Barons against Henry III., and as a consequence lost all his estates.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stambaugh research. Another 271 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1209, 1647, 1579, 1600, 1658, 1605, 1660, 1630, 1681, 1672, 1716, 1621, 1654, 1665 and are included under the topic Early Stambaugh History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 219 words (16 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Stambaugh Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Stambaugh family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 137 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Stambaugh or a variant listed above:

Stambaugh Settlers in United States in the 18th Century


  • Christian Stambaugh, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1744

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  • Robert F. Stambaugh, American economist, who specializes in econometrics and finance
  • Lyman Aldinger Stambaugh, American Democrat politician, Postmaster at York, Pennsylvania, 1964-65, 1965-73 (acting, 1964-65, 1965-66)
  • Lloyd D. Stambaugh, American Republican politician, Chair of Perry County Republican Party, 1953
  • David W. Stambaugh, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Ohio, 1864
  • Amy Stambaugh, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Nevada, 1952
  • John Wesley Stambaugh (1887-1970), Canadian farmer and Canadian Senator


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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Per tot discrimina verun
Motto Translation: Through so many dangers

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  1. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  2. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  3. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  4. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  5. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  6. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  7. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  8. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  9. Elster, Robert J. International Who's Who. London: Europa/Routledge. Print.
  10. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  11. ...

The Stambaugh Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Stambaugh Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 January 2016 at 12:57.

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