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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Origins Available: English, Scottish


The name Smythie comes from one of the family having worked as a metalworker (the blacksmith). It is derived from the Old English word smid, probably derived form "smitan," which meant "to strike with a hammer." As metal worker was such a common and important profession in Medieval times, this name and its cognates are extremely widespread throughout the British Isles and Europe. However, there is some debate as to why the occupation of blacksmith would lead to such a populous surname. One might expect that Farmer, also an occupational name, but with far more people involved in the profession in the Middle Ages, would today be a much more populous surname than Smith. It is probably a futile exercise to try to establish a single source for this amazing, monumentally prolific surname.

Smythie Early Origins



The surname Smythie was first found in Durham, in present day Northumbria (North-Eastern England) where an Olde English version of the name is cited in circa 975, almost 100 years before the Normans would invade this part of England. Some of the family moved to Mount Thoydon in Essex. "The church [of Mount Thoydon] is a handsome edifice, containing many fine monuments to the family of Smyth, among which is one to Sir Thomas Smyth, chancellor of the garter, and principal secretary of state, in the reigns of Edward VI. and Elizabeth." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
"Wootton Hall [in Wooton-Wawen, Warwickshire] was early the seat of the Smythe family, of whom was Lord Carrington, who, at the battle of Edge-Hill, bravely redeemed the royal standard, as is recorded on his monument in Christ-Church, Oxford. Over the front entrance of the Hall are the arms, finely executed in relief, of Lord Carrington. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Smythie Spelling Variations


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Smythie Spelling Variations



Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Smythie have been found, including: Smith, Smyth, Smythe and others.

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Smythie Early History


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Smythie Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Smythie research. Another 187 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1100, 1279, 1568, 1655, 1559, 1608, 1657, 1640, 1644, 1663, 1631, 1649, 1650, 1652, 1653, 1658, 1616, 1617, 1675, 1621, 1681, 1661, 1679, 1679, 1611, 1691, 1616, 1696, 1662, 1717, 1701, 1665, 1720, 1699 and are included under the topic Early Smythie History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Smythie Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Smythie Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of this surname at this time include Richard Smith (1568-1655), officially the Bishop of Chalcedon, the second Catholic bishop for England, Wales and Scotland after Catholicism was banned in England in 1559; John Smith ( c. 1608-1657), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1644...

Another 160 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Smythie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Smythie In Ireland


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Smythie In Ireland



Some of the Smythie family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 163 words (12 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Smythie, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were : Rich Smith, who settled in Virginia in 1638; Abbigall Smith, who was granted land in Virginia in 1673; James Smith and his wife Mary, who immigrated to Boston in 1718 with their children, Abel Smith, who came to Boston in 1763.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Benigno Numine
Motto Translation: By Divine Providence.


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Smythie Family Crest Products


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Smythie Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  2. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  3. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  5. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  6. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  7. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  8. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  9. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  10. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  11. ...

The Smythie Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Smythie Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 March 2016 at 16:11.

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