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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The ancestors of the Rundall family brought their name to England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They lived in Kent, at the Manor of Rundale, from whence their name is derived. "Randall, formerly called Roundall and Rundale, is a manor in this parish, which, though at present of little repute, was anciently of some note, as being one of the seats of the noble family of Cobham, where they are Baid to have resided before they removed to Cobham Hall." "In the XIII. century, John de Cobham gave Rundale to his second son Henry, and his descendants were variously written Roundale, Rundel, Roundall, and Rundella, and so lately as 8 Henry VI. the then proprietor of the estate was styled Lord Thomas de Cobham, alias Rundella, Knight." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
While many of the family emigrated to England, not all did. Lucas, Geoffry and John Roondel were listed in Normandy (1180-1195) and later Stephen Roundel, Geoffry, Hugh and Lucas Roondel were listed there in 1198. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)


Rundall Early Origins



The surname Rundall was first found in Kent where they were a branch of the great Baronial family of Cobham, seated as Lords of the Manor of Roundell in the parish of Shorne. In the 13th century John Cobham gave the Manor of Rundale to his second son. He was styled Lord Thomas de Cobham, alias Roundell, Knight. From this scion many branches descended, many with different spellings of the name Roundell, into the counties of Devon, Cornwall and Somerset. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
"The Roundells of Screven, in Yorkshire, have possessed Screven ever since the early part of the XV. century, the first recorded progenitor being John Roundel, of that place, 3. Henry VI. [(during the third year of the reign of Henry VI)]" [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

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Rundall Spelling Variations


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Rundall Spelling Variations



Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Rundall were recorded, including Roundle, Roundall, Roundell, Roundill, Roundale and many more.

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Rundall Early History


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Rundall Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rundall research. Another 295 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1422, 1558, 1582, 1611 and 1591 are included under the topic Early Rundall History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Rundall Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Rundall Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Roundell of Screven living temp. Henry VI, generally understood to be the progenitor the Gledstone branch. His grandson Marmaduke Roundell married Jane Lowe in 1558 and they bore a son William Roundell who died in 1582. His...

Another 46 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Rundall Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Rundall In Ireland


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Rundall In Ireland



Some of the Rundall family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 74 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



The unstable environment in England at this time caused numerous families to board ships and leave in search of opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad in places like Ireland, Australia, and particularly the New World. The voyage was extremely difficult, however, and only taken at great expense. The cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels caused many to arrive diseased and starving, not to mention destitute from the enormous cost. Still opportunity in the emerging nations of Canada and the United States was far greater than at home and many went on to make important contributions to the cultures of their adopted countries. An examination of many early immigration records reveals that people bearing the name Rundall arrived in North America very early: Joseph Rondall who landed in Virginia in 1651.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Tenax propositi
Motto Translation: Firm of purpose.


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Rundall Family Crest Products


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Rundall Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

Other References

  1. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  2. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  4. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  5. Dunkling, Leslie. Dictionary of Surnames. Toronto: Collins, 1998. Print. (ISBN 0004720598).
  6. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  7. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  8. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  9. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  10. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  11. ...

The Rundall Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Rundall Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 10 January 2017 at 15:00.

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