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Loteral History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Loteral reached England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Loteral family lived in Nottinghamshire. Many people think the name Luttrell was originally derived from the Old French word l'outre which means otter, but others believe the name could have been derived from Lutterell, a place in Normandy.

"Robert Lotrel and Hugh his son were benefactors to the Abbey of Barberie, Normandy and its foundation. Symon Mutro was mentioned in England in 1130." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)



Early Origins of the Loteral family


The surname Loteral was first found in Lincolnshire where one of the first records of the name was Sir Geoffrey de Luterel I (1160-1222), courtier and confidante of King John. His son, Robert Luttrel was Lord Chancellor of Ireland (1238-1245) and his great grandson Sir Geoffrey Luttrell III (1276-1345) held a family seat at Irnham Hall at Irnham in Lincolnshire.

We must also look to Yorkshire for the family's ancient lineage. "In the reigns of Henry I. and Stephen, Sir J. Luttrell (probably a grandson of the Norman warrior) held in capite, the manor of Hoton Pagnel which eventually devolved upon an heiress, who married John Scott, feudal Lord of Calverley, and Steward of the household to the Empress Maud. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.

Later, a branch of the family held a family seat at Beskaby in Leicestershire. "The manor of 'Bescoldeby' was held in 1363 by Andrew Luttrell, for Croxton Abbey." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Loteral family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Loteral research.
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1295, 1518, 1551, 1628, 1666, 1656, 1666, 1490, 1554, 1657, 1732, 1226, 1238, 1420, 1655, 1717, 1713, 1787 and 1800 are included under the topic Early Loteral History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Loteral Spelling Variations


Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, Norman French and other languages became incorporated into English throughout the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Loteral include Luttrell, Loteral, Lutteral, Lutterall, Lutterell and many more.

Early Notables of the Loteral family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir John Luttrell (c. 1518-1551), who took the Queen of Scotland prisoner on the field of battle; Francis Luttrell (1628 - 1666), an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1656 and 1666; Sir Thomas...
Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Loteral Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Loteral family to Ireland


Some of the Loteral family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 157 words (11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Loteral family to the New World and Oceana


In England at this time, the uncertainty of the political and religious environment of the time caused many families to board ships for distant British colonies in the hopes of finding land and opportunity, and escaping persecution. The voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, though, and many arrived in North America sick, starved, and destitute. Those who did make it, however, were greeted with greater opportunities and freedoms that they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Early immigration records have shown some of the first Loterals to arrive on North American shores: Walter Luttrell, who came to Barbados in 1635; James Luttrell, who settled in New England in 1759; Elizabeth Luttrell, who came to New Brunswick in 1824.

The Loteral Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quaesita marte tuenda arte
Motto Translation: Things obtained by war must be defended by art.


Loteral Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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