× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Littrell arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Littrell family lived in Nottinghamshire. Many people think the name Luttrell was originally derived from the Old French word l'outre which means otter, but others believe the name could have been derived from Lutterell, a place in Normandy.

Littrell Early Origins



The surname Littrell was first found in Lincolnshire where one of the first records of the name was Sir Geoffrey de Luterel I (1160-1222), courtier and confidante of King John. His son, Robert Luttrel was Lord Chancellor of Ireland (1238-1245) and his great grandson Sir Geoffrey Luttrell III (1276-1345) held a family seat at Irnham Hall at Irnham in Lincolnshire. We must also look to Yorkshire for the family's ancient lineage. "In the reigns of Henry I. and Stephen, Sir J. Luttrell (probably a grandson of the Norman warrior) held in capite, the manor of Hoton Pagnel which eventually devolved upon an heiress, who married John Scott, feudal Lord of Calverley, and Steward of the household to the Empress Maud. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
Later, a branch of the family held a family seat at Beskaby in Leicestershire. "The manor of 'Bescoldeby' was held in 1363 by Andrew Luttrell, for Croxton Abbey." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Close

Littrell Spelling Variations


Expand

Littrell Spelling Variations



A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Luttrell, Loteral, Lutteral, Lutterall, Lutterell and many more.

Close

Littrell Early History


Expand

Littrell Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Littrell research. Another 171 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1295, 1518, 1551, 1628, 1666, 1656, 1666, 1490, 1554, 1657, 1732, 1226, 1238, 1420, 1655, 1717, 1713, 1787 and 1800 are included under the topic Early Littrell History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Littrell Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

Littrell Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir John Luttrell ( c. 1518-1551), who took the Queen of Scotland prisoner on the field of battle; Francis Luttrell (1628 - 1666), an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1656 and 1666; Sir Thomas...

Another 48 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Littrell Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Littrell In Ireland


Expand

Littrell In Ireland



Some of the Littrell family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 303 words (22 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Littrell or a variant listed above:

Littrell Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Marion Littrell, aged 37, who settled in Raton, New Mexico, in 1919
  • Roy Littrell, aged 33, who emigrated to Raton, New Mexico, in 1919

Close

Contemporary Notables of the name Littrell (post 1700)


Expand

Contemporary Notables of the name Littrell (post 1700)



  • Gary Lee Littrell (b. 1944), retired United States Army Command Sergeant Major, recipient of the Medal of Honor
  • Jack Napier Littrell (1929-2009), American Major League Baseball shortstop who played from 1952 through 1957
  • Brian Thomas Littrell (b. 1975), American singer, member of the "Backstreet Boys"

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quaesita marte tuenda arte
Motto Translation: Things obtained by war must be defended by art.


Close

Littrell Family Crest Products


Expand

Littrell Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



  1. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  2. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  3. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  5. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  7. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  8. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  9. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  10. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  11. ...

The Littrell Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Littrell Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 16 March 2016 at 14:58.

Sign Up

  


FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
House of Names on Facebook
Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
Houseofnames on Pinterest