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Jowett History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Jowett is one of the names carried to England in the great wave of migration from Normandy following the Norman Conquest in 1066. It is based on the ancient personal name Julien. The surname of Jowett was a baptismal name which means Julien. Baptismal names began to appear as surnames relatively late in the growth of the naming tradition. This is a little surprising, given the popularity of biblical figures in the Christian countries of Europe. Nevertheless, surnames derived from baptismal names grew in popularity during the Middle Ages, and have become one of the foremost sources for surnames.

Early Origins of the Jowett family


The surname Jowett was first found in Cheshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the manor of Bredbury from early times. The lands were granted by William the Conqueror to a Norman noble by the name Jouet, from the Isle of Rhe in France. By the twelfth century they had branched to Ashton-under-Lyme in that same shire.

Early History of the Jowett family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jowett research.
Another 235 words (17 lines of text) covering the years 1643, 1720, 1693, 1694 and 1701 are included under the topic Early Jowett History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jowett Spelling Variations


Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Jowett have been found, including Jowett, Jowet, Jowit, Jowitt, Jewett, Jewet, Juet, Jouet, Juett and many more.

Early Notables of the Jowett family (pre 1700)


Another 40 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jowett Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jowett family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Jowett Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Mr. John Jowett, (b. 1852), aged 22, Cornish farm labourer departing on 16th November 1874 aboard the ship "Rakaia" arriving in Lyttelton, Canterbury, New Zealand on 7th February 1875 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf

Contemporary Notables of the name Jowett (post 1700)


  • William L. Jowett (b. 1934), American Republican politician, St. Clair County Coroner, 1958-62; Member of Michigan State House of Representatives 76th District, 1967-80; Defeated in primary, 1964 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 20) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Benjamin Jowett (1877-1963), who with his brother William Jowett (1880-1965) were English founders of the Jowett, a manufacturer of light cars and light commercial vehicles in Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire, operational from 1906 to 1954
  • Sylvester James "Jim" Jowett (b. 1926), English former amateur footballer
  • William Jowett (1787-1855), English missionary and author who became the first Anglican clergyman to volunteer for the overseas service of the Church Missionary Society in 1813
  • Alan Jowett, English author of the famous Railway Atlas of Great Britain & Ireland from pre-grouping to the present day (1989)
  • Benjamin Jowett (1817-1893), English scholar, Oxford Don, and theologian
  • Very Rev. Alfred Jowett, Dean of Manchester
  • Frederick William Jowett (1864-1944), British Labour politician who took an anti-war stance
  • Fred Jowett (1879-1939), Wales and British Lion rugby union player

The Jowett Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Animo et prudentia
Motto Translation: By courage and prudence.


Jowett Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 2018, April 30). Emigrants to Lyttelton 1858-84 [PDF]. Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/new_zealand_assisted.pdf
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 20) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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