Ireland History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Ireland is a Dalriadan-Scottish name, no doubt originally for a person who lived in Ireland. According to tradition, this surname originated when emigrants from Ireland acquired the Norman surnames of de Yrlande and le Ireis. Eventually, some of the descendants of these emigrants returned to the Emerald Isle as strangers. The names went through further changes, first occurring in their modern forms by 1664, in the Hearth Money Rolls for Armagh. The surnames Ireland and Irish were formerly well-known in Couny Kilkenny, but are now primarily found in Ulster. [1]

These names provide an interesting example of Hiberno-Norman name formation in that, unlike most Norman names in Ireland, they did not originate with people of Norman stock who then migrated to Ireland. Rather, they originated with Irish migrants who moved to Norman-speaking regions, gained their surnames, and then returned to Ireland. The word "Ireland" goes back to the Old English Iraland, created using the Celtic Ir.

Early Origins of the Ireland family

The surname Ireland was first found in Stirlingshire, where one of the first records of the name was John Yberniens de Frertun who was a witness in 1288. Patrick of Ireland, was accused of housebreaking at Forfar, was hanged in 1296. David de Ireland was one of the Scots prisoners taken at Dunbar Castle in 1296; and cattle belonging to Walter de Ibemia were driven off from a moor near Aberdeen in the same year. Robert de Irland of Stirlingshire rendered homage to King Edward I of England in 1296. [2]

Some of the family were found further south in England. The township of Lydiate in Lancashire is one such place. "In the reign of Richard II., this place was possessed by a family of the local name, whose heiress married into the Blackburn family; and an heiress of the latter conveyed Lydiate to Thomas, son of Sir John Ireland, of the Hutt, and Hale. The Irelands continued to hold the property till the latter part of the 17th century." [3]

Another source notes "the family are descended from Sir John de Ireland of Lancashire, temp. William the Conqueror." [4]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included: Thomas de Ireland; Johannes de Yrland; Margereta Ireland; and Walterus Ireland as all holding lands there at that time. [5]

For a short period, Warrington, Lancashire was an early family seat of the family. The manor was originally held by the "Boteler family until nearly the end of the sixteenth century, when the Boteler manors and estates were broken up and the Irelands, who purchased the principal share, enfranchised the subordinate manors of the fee. It was purchased by Thomas Ireland, afterwards a knight, in 1597. In 1628, however, his son Thomas Ireland of Bewsey and Margaret his wife, together with George and Robert Ireland, joined in selling the manors of Warrington, Orford, and Arpley, with various lands and rents, to William Booth, eldest son of Sir George Booth, Baronet, of Dunham Massey in Cheshire." [6]

Early History of the Ireland family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ireland research. Another 153 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1336, 1489, 1524, 1454, 1600, 1636, 1679, 1677, 1678, 1678, 1679, 1929, 1624, 1675, 1654, 1675 and are included under the topic Early Ireland History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Spelling Variations

Spelling variations were extremely common in medieval names, since scribes from that era recorded names according to sound rather than a standard set of rules. Ireland has appeared in various documents spelled Ireland, Ierland and others.

Early Notables of the Ireland family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the Clan from early times was Blessed William Ireland (1636-1679), alias Ironmonger, an English Jesuit. He the "eldest son of William Ireland of Crofton Hall, Yorkshire, by Barbara, daughter of Ralph (afterwards Lord) Eure of Washingborough, Lincolnshire. After being for some years confessor to the Poor Clares at Gravelines, he was in 1677 sent to the English mission, and shortly afterwards became procurator of the province in London. On the night of 28 Sept. 1678 he was arrested by a body of constables, headed by Titus Oates in person, and carried before the privy council, together with Thomas Jenison...
Another 151 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ireland Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Ireland family to Ireland

Some of the Ireland family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Ireland migration to the United States +

Many who arrived from Scotland settled along the east coast of North America in communities that would go on to become the backbones of the young nations of the United States and Canada. In the American War of Independence, many settlers who remained loyal to England went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Their descendants later began to recover the lost Scottish heritage through events such as the highland games that dot North America in the summer months. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Ireland family emigrate to North America:

Ireland Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Martha Ireland, who settled in Boston in 1635 along with Mary, Samuel and Thomas
  • Martha Ireland, aged 1, who landed in New England in 1635 [7]
  • Samuell Ireland, aged 32, who landed in America in 1635 [7]
  • Tho Ireland, aged 10, who arrived in Bermuda in 1635 [7]
  • John Ireland, who settled in Virginia in 1640
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Ireland Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Robert Ireland, who arrived in Virginia in 1705 [7]
  • Sarah Ireland, who arrived in Virginia in 1705 [7]
  • George Fredrick Ireland, who arrived in America in 1764 [7]
  • Robert Ireland, who landed in New York in 1782 [7]
Ireland Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Wallace Ireland, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1808 [7]
  • James Ireland, who landed in New York in 1826 [7]
  • William M Ireland, who arrived in New York in 1835 [7]
  • Henry Ireland, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1837 [7]
  • Richard Ireland, who arrived in Virginia in 1884 [7]

Canada Ireland migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Ireland Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mrs. Mary Rain Ireland, aged 46 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Odessa" departing from the port of Dublin, Ireland but died on Grosse Isle on 15th August 1847 [8]
  • Miss. Mary Ireland, aged 2 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Free Trader" departing 22nd June 1847 from Liverpool, England; the ship arrived on 14th August 1847 but she died on board [9]

Australia Ireland migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Ireland Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Robert Ireland, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Asia" on September 3rd, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia [10]
  • John Ireland, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Argyle" on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [11]
  • Mr. Robert Ireland, Scottish convict who was convicted in Perth, Scotland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Henry Tanner" on 27th June 1834, settling in New South Wales, Australia [12]
  • George Ireland, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "The Stebonheath" in 1850 [13]
  • Robert Ireland, aged 20, a ploughman, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "David Malcolm" [14]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Ireland migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Ireland Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John de Courcy Ireland, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840
  • William Ireland, aged 28, a stonemason, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "New Zealand" in 1842
  • Margaret Ireland, aged 26, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "New Zealand" in 1842
  • Joseph Ireland, aged 44, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Inchinnan" in 1852
  • Mary Ireland, aged 41, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Inchinnan" in 1852
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Ireland (post 1700) +

  • Dan Ireland (1958-2016), American film director, producer and co-founder of the Seattle International Film Festival
  • Kathy Ireland (b. 1963), American model, actress, author, and entrepreneur
  • Julius W. Ireland, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Marine Corps, during World War II, credited with 5 aerial victories
  • Core Serena Ireland (1874-1943), American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1916, 1932, 1936 [15]
  • Clifford Cady Ireland (1878-1930), American Republican politician, U.S. Representative from Illinois 16th District, 1917-23; Defeated in primary, 1922; Member of Illinois Republican State Central Committee, 1925 [15]
  • Clarence Leo Ireland (b. 1889), American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Colorado, 1956 [15]
  • Charles H. Ireland, American politician, Delegate to Illinois State Constitutional Convention 16th District, 1920-22 [15]
  • Charles Ireland, American politician, Mayor of Las Vegas, Nevada, 1921; Appointed 1921; Resigned 1921 [15]
  • C. Boyd Ireland Jr., American Democrat politician, Candidate for New York State Senate 46th District, 1924 [15]
  • Betty S. Ireland (b. 1946), American Republican politician, Secretary of State of West Virginia, 2005-09; Delegate to Republican National Convention from West Virginia, 2008, 2012; Presidential Elector for West Virginia, 2012 [15]
  • ... (Another 42 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Ireland family +

Halifax Explosion
  • Mrs. Alice Maud  Ireland (1880-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [16]
  • Mr. Angus  Ireland, Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [16]
  • Master William  Ireland (1914-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [16]
  • Miss Alice M.  Ireland (1916-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [16]
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Alec Ireland, British Stoker 2ne Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [17]


The Ireland Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Amor et pax
Motto Translation: Love and peace.


Suggested Readings for the name Ireland +

  • 2105 Genealogies of the Caffey, Isley & Ireland Families by Beatrice M. Caffey, The Irelands in America by Everett B. Ireland.

  1. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Supplement to Irish Families. Baltimore: Genealogical Book Company, 1964. Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Sims, Clifford Stanley The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames. 1862. Print.
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 35)
  9. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 81)
  10. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Asia 1 voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1820 with 192 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/asia/1820
  11. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Argyle voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1831 with 251 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/argyle/1831
  12. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 7th January 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/henry-tanner
  13. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The STEBONHEATH 1850. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1850Stebonheath.htm
  14. ^ South Australian Register Wednesday 5th January 1854. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) David Malcolm 1854. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/davidmalcolm1854.shtml
  15. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 20) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  16. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  17. ^ HMS Repulse Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listrepulsecrew.html


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