Hubarte History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Hubarte is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. Hubarte is a name that comes from the Norman personal name Hildebert, which is composed of the Germanic elements "hild," which meant "battle" or "strife," and "berht," which meant "bright" or "famous." The Norman Conquerors imported a vast number of Norman French personal names into England, which largely replaced traditional Old English personal names among the upper and middle classes.

Early Origins of the Hubarte family

The surname Hubarte was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where the early Latin form of the name was found in Hampshire, Eudo filius Huberti. [1]

The family may have descended from Roger and/or Ralph Hubert, who were listed in the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae (1180). [2]

Later on in London, as a forename, Hubert de Bissoppesgate was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of 1292. Thomas Huberd (Hubert) was found in Dorset in the Pipe Rolls of 1230, William Hoberd was in the Feet of Fines for Suffolk in 1292 and Roger Hubard was in the Subsidy Rolls for Somerset in 1327. [3]

Osbert Houbard was also listed in Somerset, Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [4]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 recorded Petrus Hubard; Alicia Hubard; and Isabella Hoberd as all holding lands there at that time. [5]

"Hubbard is a characteristic Norfolk name. The early form of the name in this and the neighbouring counties, both in Domesday times and in the centuries immediately following, was Hubert, occasionally written Huberd; and we find that Robert Hubert or Hoberd was rector of Seaming at the close of the 14th century. Thence, the transition to Hubberd, and on to Hubbard is an easy one. " [6]

The English nursery rhyme "Old Mother Hubbard" is generally attributed to Sarah Catherine Martin (1768-1826), who lived in Yealmpton, Devon and was first published under the title "The Comic Adventures of Old Mother Hubbard and her Dog."

Early History of the Hubarte family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hubarte research. Another 258 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1190, 1588, 1775, 1783, 1621, 1704, 1757, 1837, 1770, 1849 and 1642 are included under the topic Early Hubarte History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hubarte Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Hubarte has been recorded under many different variations, including Hubert, Hubbert, Hubbard and others.

Early Notables of the Hubarte family (pre 1700)

Another 47 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hubarte Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Hubarte family to Ireland

Some of the Hubarte family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 49 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hubarte family

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Hubartes were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: Benjamin and Alice Hubbard, who came to Charlestown, MA in 1633; Ann Hubbard, who came to Dedham, MA in 1638; Benjamin Hubbard, who arrived in Charlestown, MA in 1633.



  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.


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