Hinken History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient roots of the Hinken family are in the Anglo-Saxon culture. The name Hinken comes from when the family lived at Hingham, a market-town and parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe in Norfolk. The parish dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was known as Hincham. [1]

By 1173, the parish was known as Heingeham and probably meant "homestead of the family or followers of a man called Hega," from the Old English personal name + "inga" + "ham. [2]

Early Origins of the Hinken family

The surname Hinken was first found in Norfolk where Ralph de Hungham or Hengham, (d. 1311), the early English judge, son of Sir Andrew de Hengham or Hingham, was born at St. Andrew's Manor during the second quarter of the thirteenth century.

"Like most of the great lawyers of his time he was an ecclesiastic. On 29 Oct. 1274 he was preferred to the prebend of Moreton-cum-Whaddon in the church of Hereford; on 19 Oct. 1275 he was appointed to the chancellorship of the diocese of Exeter, which he resigned in 1279. In 1280 he received the prebendal stall of Cadington Major in the church of St. Paul's, which he held until his death. On 16 Nov. 1287 he was appointed to the archdeaconry of Worcester, but resigned the office in the following year (Le Neve, Fasti, i. 417, 512, ii. 369, iii. 74). His rise as a lawyer must have been rapid. " [3]

Oliver de Ingham Baron Ingham (d. 1344), Seneschal of Aquitaine, was "son of Sir John de Ingham (1260-1309) of Ingham, Norfolk, by his wife Maroya or Mercy. An ancestor, also named Oliver, was living in 1183. John de Ingham served frequently in Edward I's wars in Scotland. Oliver was summoned to perform military service in Scotland in 1310 and 1314. In 1321 he was made governor of Ellesmere Castle, Shropshire, and next year actively supported the king in his operations against Thomas of Lancaster." [3]

Early English rolls provide us a glimpse of the spelling variations used through Medieval times. Ralph de Hengham was listed in the Subsidy Rolls for Worcester in 1275 and Ralph de Hengham was recorded in Yorkshire in 1303. [4]

The Ingham variant similarly hails from Norfolk, but some could have originated in Lincolnshire. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 include: John de Ingham, Norfolk; Nicholas de Ingham, Norfolk; and Oliver de Ingeham, Wiltshire. [5]

Early History of the Hinken family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hinken research. Another 70 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1328, 1287 and 1344 are included under the topic Early Hinken History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hinken Spelling Variations

Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Hinken family name include Ingham, Hugham, Inghem, Ingam and others.

Early Notables of the Hinken family (pre 1700)

Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hinken Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Hinken migration to the United States +

For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, Canada, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Hinken surname or a spelling variation of the name include:

Hinken Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Peter Bernard Hinken, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1765 [6]


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate