Hatteway History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Hatteway comes from the Old German personal names Hathuwic or Hadewic, or from the Old English personal name Heathuwig, which means war-warrior. [1]

Early Origins of the Hatteway family

The surname Hatteway was first found in Herefordshire where Hadeuui was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. [2] For the next hundred years or so, only surnames were used so it is not surprising to see the next entry, that of Hathewi in the Pipe Rolls of Worcester in 1175. [1]

Again in Herefordshire, William Hatewi, Hadewi, Hathewy were listed there in the Pipe Rolls of 1178 and 1181. Nigel Haðewi was found in the Gloucestershire Pipe Rolls of 1208 and Thomas Hatheweye was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Staffordshire in 1380. [1]

The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 included Willelmus de Haythewy. [3]

Moving further to the north in Scotland, "Alexander Hathwy appears as a witness in Linlithgow in 1444 and 1465, and Robert Hadowy was burgess of Lychtcow (Linlithgow), 1460." [4]

Anne Hathaway (1556-1623), the wife of William Shakespeare is thought to have been born in Shottery, a village just to the west of Stratford-upon-Avon where her father, Richard Hathaway, a yeoman farmer died in September 1581.

Early History of the Hatteway family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hatteway research. Another 191 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1582, 1633, 1734, 1621, 1502, 1503, 1600, 1607, 1622, 1626, 1646, 1665, 1656, 1702, 1700, 1701, 1702 and 1602 are included under the topic Early Hatteway History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Hatteway Spelling Variations

One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Hatteway has appeared include Hathaway, Hatheway, Hathoway, Hathway and others.

Early Notables of the Hatteway family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Richard Hathaway (fl. 1702), an English impostor, a blacksmith's apprentice of Southwark. "In February 1700 he gave out that he was bewitched by an old woman named Sarah Morduck, the wife of a waterman, and that, as an effect of her sorcery, he vomited nails and pins, was unable to eat, speak, or open his eyes, and was otherwise strangely affected. His only remedy was to scratch Morduck until she bled, when he recovered for a time. He prepared a narrative of his case, but the printer to whom he took the copy...
Another 248 words (18 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hatteway Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Hatteway family

At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Hatteway arrived in North America very early: Joe Hathoway settled in New England in 1635; Francis Hathaway settled in Virginia in 1652; John and Susan Hathaway settled in Boston in 1635.



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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