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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


Gateherd is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. It comes from the Germanic personal name Godhard, which is composed of the elements god, which means good, and hard, which means brave or strong.

Gateherd Early Origins



The surname Gateherd was first found in Wiltshire at Berwick-Bassett, a parish, in the union of Marlborough, hundred of Calne, Marlborough and Ramsbury. "The ancient manorhouse [of Berwick-Bassett], many ages since the residence of the Goddard family, is still remaining." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Gateherd Spelling Variations


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Gateherd Spelling Variations



Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Gateherd family name include Goddard, Goddart, Godard, Godart, Godarte, Godert, Godderd and many more.

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Gateherd Early History


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Gateherd Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Gateherd research. Another 195 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1200, 1208, 1221, 1299, 1617 and 1675 are included under the topic Early Gateherd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Gateherd Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Gateherd Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Jonathan Goddard (1617-1675), an English physician, Army Surgeon to the forces of Oliver Cromwell, an active member of the...

Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Gateherd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Gateherd family to immigrate North America: John Goddard landed in Dover, Massachusetts in 1632 and William Goddard purchased land in Watertown in the same state in 1635. By the mid-1800's the Goddard name was found in Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, and as far west as San Francisco..

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cervus non servus
Motto Translation: A stag not enslaved.


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Gateherd Family Crest Products


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Gateherd Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  2. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  3. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  4. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
  5. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  6. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  7. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  8. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  9. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  10. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  11. ...

The Gateherd Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Gateherd Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 16 March 2016 at 14:55.

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