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Evorey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancient Anglo-Saxon surname Evorey came from the given name Averary. For example, the first recorded instance of the name is Rogerus filius Averary. His name means Rogerus son of Averary. Over time, the name changed until it achieved its modern form.

One distinguished source notes: "This is a name which may claim its origin with nearly equal probability from several distinct sources, which I shall briefly enumerate. I. Aviarim, a keeper of the birds. The Forest Charter (s. 14,) enacts that freemen may have in their woods "avyries of sparhawkes, falcons, eagles, and herons." II. A very, the place where forage for the king's horses was kept; either from the Latin avena, Anglo-Norman haver, oats, or from aver, a northern provincialism for a working horse. III. Alberic, a German personal name, Latinized Albericus, and softened in Norman times to Aubrey. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.



Early Origins of the Evorey family


The surname Evorey was first found in the county of Northumberland where they held a family seat from very ancient times. Rogerus filius Averary resided in the year 1166, and held manors and estates. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 had two entries of the family with very early spellings: Hugh filius Auveray, Nottinghamshire; and Ralph Averey, Oxfordshire. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

One branch of the family was found in Egginton, Derbyshire from ancient times. "The church [of Egginton], an ancient structure with a nave, chancel, aisles, and a neat low tower, contains several monuments to the Every family, and has some remains of stained glass." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Evorey family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Evorey research.
Another 111 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1275, 1588, 1526, 1548, 1596, 1766, 1664, 1654, 1643, 1679, 1679, 1620, 1700, 1653, 1696 and 1690 are included under the topic Early Evorey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Evorey Spelling Variations


Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Evorey family name include Avery, Averie, Avary, Every, MacAvera and others.

Early Notables of the Evorey family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include Sir Richard Avery; Samuel Avery (died 1664) was an English merchant and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1654; John Every (c 1643-1679), an English landowner and politician from Dorset who sat in the House of Commons in 1679; and James Avery (b. 1620-1700), Cornish immigrant to America to become an American colonial landowner, legislator, and a military commander in King Philip's War. Henry Every, also Avery or Avary, (c. 1653-after 1696), sometimes given as John Avery...
Another 87 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Evorey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Evorey family to Ireland


Some of the Evorey family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Evorey family to the New World and Oceana


For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Evorey surname or a spelling variation of the name include: Jacob and George who settled in Virginia in 1635. Christopher Avery settled in Gloucester Massachusetts in 1640.

Evorey Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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