Evered History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Evered is an ancient Anglo-Saxon name. It was a name given to a person who was a a hard and ever enduring personality. The surname Evered originally derived from the Old German Eberhardt which referred to the endurance and strength of a boar. It was adopted in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Everard of Normandy and William Evrard were both listed in the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae, 1198. [1]

Early Origins of the Evered family

The surname Evered was first found in the Domesday Book of 1086 where Ebrard, Eurardus were listed at that time. [2] Richard and William Everard were listed in the Curia Regis Rolls for Bedfordshire in 1204 and later in the Assize Rolls for Somerset in 1225. A few years later, William Euerrad was listed in the Pipe Rolls for Leicestershire in 1230. Symon Eborard was listed in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1215 in Norfolk. [3]

Eborard or Everard (1083?-1150), was the second bishop of Norwich, whose whole career is involved in a mist of uncertainty. "Till recently it was believed without misgiving that he was the son of Roger, Lord of Belleme. All that we certainly know of Eborard is that he was Archdeacon of Salisbury in 1121." [4]

Early History of the Evered family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Evered research. Another 48 words (3 lines of text) covering the years 1575, 1650, 1575, 1680, 1654, 1656, 1625, 1694, 1661, 1679, 1560, 1633, 1560, 1664, 1611, 1668 and 1187 are included under the topic Early Evered History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Evered Spelling Variations

One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Evered has appeared include Everard, Evererd, Everid and others.

Early Notables of the Evered family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include John Everard (1575?-1650?), English divine and mystic, probably born about 1575; Sir Richard Everard, 1st Baronet (died 1680) an English politician, Member of Parliament for Essex (1654-1656); and Sir Richard Everard, 2nd Baronet (1625-1694), an English politician, Member of Parliament for Westminster (1661-1679). Thomas Everard alias Everett (1560-1633), was an Enlgish Jesuit, born at Linstead, Suffolk, on 8 Feb. 1560, the son of Henry Everard, a gentleman...
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Evered Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Evered family to Ireland

Some of the Evered family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 54 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Evered migration to the United States +

At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Evered arrived in North America very early:

Evered Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Evered, who arrived in New England in 1635 [5]
  • Stephen Evered, who arrived in New England in 1635 [5]
  • Tho Evered, who landed in Virginia in 1656 [5]

New Zealand Evered migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

  • Ann Evered, aged 35, a servant, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Phoebe Dunbar" between 1841 and 1850
  • Thomas Evered, aged 3 months, who arrived in Otago aboard the ship "Phoebe Dunbar" between 1841 and 1850
Evered Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Captain Evered, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Jocelyn" arriving in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand on 2nd January 1881, en-route to Te Puke, New Zealand [6]
  • Mrs. G.E. Evered, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Jocelyn" arriving in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand on 2nd January 1881, en-route to Te Puke, New Zealand [6]
  • H.F.N. Evered, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Jocelyn" arriving in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand on 2nd January 1881, en-route to Te Puke, New Zealand [6]
  • Miss Adela Evered, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Jocelyn" arriving in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand on 2nd January 1881, en-route to Te Puke, New Zealand [6]
  • Mr. John Evered, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Lady Jocelyn" arriving in Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand on 2nd January 1881, en-route to Te Puke, New Zealand [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Evered (post 1700) +

  • Captain and Bimbashi Henry Evered Haymes SBStJ, MRCS LRCP, (1872-1904), British surgeon in the Royal Army Medical Corps, known chiefly for his service in Egypt and the Sudan
  • Frederick Evered Lunt (1900-1982), English 9th Anglican Bishop of Stepney


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  6. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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