Dodman History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Dodman is an ancient Anglo-Saxon name that is derived from the short form of Rodger or Roger.

Early Origins of the Dodman family

The surname Dodman was first found in Kent where they held a family seat from very early times. The name dates back to the Exon Domesday where a class of men were called Dodomanni, later to be known as Dodeman and Deudman. [1] Dudman was an ancient personal name implying quality or some employment. Goduin filius Dudeman was the first on record of the family having been listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 in Kent. About ten years later, Goduine Dudumani was listed ay Bury in Suffolk c. 1095 and later Dudeman was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Cornwall in 1206. Thomas, Walter and John Dudeman were all listed in London in 1199 and Gilbert Dodeman was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire in 1275. [2] The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list the following: Henry Dodeman in Wiltshire; William Dodeman in Huntingdonshire; and Peter Dodeman in Kent. [3]

Early History of the Dodman family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Dodman research. Another 112 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 106 and 1066 are included under the topic Early Dodman History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Dodman Spelling Variations

Dodman has been spelled many different ways. Before English spelling became standardized over the last few hundred years, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. As the English language changed in the Middle Ages, absorbing pieces of Latin and French, as well as other languages, the spelling of people's names also changed considerably, even over a single lifetime. Many variations of the name Dodman have been found, including Dodman, Doddman, Duddman, Dudman, Doidman and many more.

Early Notables of the Dodman family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Dodman Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Dodman migration to the United States +

In an attempt to escape the chaos experienced in England, many English families boarded overcrowded and diseased ships sailing for the shores of North America and other British colonies. Those families hardy enough, and lucky enough, to make the passage intact were rewarded with land and a social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families became important contributors to the young colonies in which they settled. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Dodmans to arrive on North American shores:

Dodman Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Jon Dodman, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [4]
  • John Dodman who settled in Virginia in 1637
  • John Dodman, who landed in Virginia in 1637 [4]
Dodman Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Thomas J Dodman, who landed in America in 1807 [4]

New Zealand Dodman migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Dodman Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Charles Dodman, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Excelsior" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 17th March 1859 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Dodman (post 1700) +

  • Charles Dodman, British political candidate for the UK Independence Party National Executive Committee election in 2013, 2012 and 2011
  • Nicholas H. Dodman, Professor, Section Head and Program Director, Animal Behavior at Tufts Cumming School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Dr. Maria João Dodman, Assistant Professor at York University, Toronto, Canada


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  5. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html


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