Deun History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Deun came to England with the ancestors of the Deun family in the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Deun family lived in Surrey. However, there is no agreed upon origin for this name, so we will take a moment to explore the various qualified sources and summarize their thoughts.

Reaney postulates the name was perhaps from Old French word "digne" or "dein," meaning "worthy or honorable." He also postulated that the name could have been from "digne," meaning "haughty, reserved." [1]

Charnock notes the name could be from "De Dine, and it is probably derived from locality; perhaps from Digne (Dinia), a walled town of France." [2]

Mark Antony Lower notes the name was "Anciently Dine. Might come from the French digne, worthy. There is a statement, however, I know not of what authority, that the family were identical with the Dyves, who came into England from Normandy with the Conqueror." [3]

Harrison believes the name was from "the French Dion, an abbrev. of Latin Dionys(i)us." [4]

Bardsley believes the name was related to "a geographical locality, 'at the dane' or 'dean' " or perhaps 'at the Dene' [5]

Burke weighs in thusly and adds other authority's thoughts: "An alteration in Domesday Book itself from de Dingy to Dive has led to the future confusion as to this name. Sir F. Palgrave, in his work on public records, describing Henry de Dyne, temp. Henry III., says, this name is sometimes written de Dive, and Dugdale uses the two indiscriminately. This family were actively engaged in the contests of the barons with Kings John and Henry III.; and at the final subjection of the latter, Windsor Castle and Forest were committed to Hugo de-Dyne. They have held grants downwards from the conquest, one of them to Robereus dyns, by King Stephen, continued to them to the time of Cromwell's rebellion, when, in the hands of Sir Louis de Dyve, half-brother to Lord Digby, secretary of state to Charles I., it was confiscated by the parliament. " [6]

Early Origins of the Deun family

The surname Deun was first found in Surrey where Robert le Dine was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1201. A few years later, again in Surrey, Richard le Digne was found in the Curia Regis Rolls of 1222 and later again, Gilbert le Dyne, Dynes was found in Yorkshire in 1275 and 1284. The Subsidy Rolls of Worcester included a listing for Nicholas Dain in 1275. [1]

"The family, however, still surviving as holders of estates in Kent and Sussex, were allowed the hereditary arms during the rebellion in the name of Dyne or Dyve de Battersden, Kent, and had the same confirmed to them when scrutiny after the restoration of the Sussex visitation, 1662. The name is now represented in Kent by F. Bradley Dyne, Esq., of Gore Court, who still holds lands at Bethersden. The Sussex property passed to the Briscoes now of Coghurst, the grandfather of the present Musgrave Briscoe, Esq., having married the daughter and heiress of Edward Dyne, Esq., of Coghurst, Sussex." [6]

Early History of the Deun family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Deun research. Another 71 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1352, 1412, 1413, 1377, 1397, 1383, 1414, 1383, 1414, 1768, 1772, 1779, 1784 and 1788 are included under the topic Early Deun History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Deun Spelling Variations

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Dyne, Dine, Dives, Dynne, Dinne, Dyves, Dyon and others.

Early Notables of the Deun family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Nicholas Dyne (fl. 1352) of East Grinstead; John Dyne I (died 1412/1413), who owned land in the Kentish hundreds of Hayne, an English politician, Member of the Parliament for Hythe (1377-1397); and his son, John Dyne II (fl. 1383-1414), an English politician, Member of the Parliament for Hythe (1383-1414); and Sir John Dyne. John Dyne was a a distinguished alto...
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Deun Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Deun family

Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Deun or a variant listed above: George and Thomas Dine arrived in Philadelphia in 1836; William Dyon settled in Virginia in 1649.



  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Charnock, Richard, Stephen, Ludus Patronymicus of The Etymology of Curious Surnames. London: Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, 1868. Print.
  3. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey. London: Edward Churton, 26, Holles Street, 1848, Print.


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