Copping History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Copping was brought to England by the Normans when they conquered the country in 1066. The ancestors of the Copping family lived in Suffolk which is derived from the Old English copp, a word for the top or summit of a hill, and indicates someone who lived in such a place. Another reference presumes that the name was derived from the word "coppin," which was a "piece of yarn taken from a spindle." [1] The Suffolk expression "To live like a Coppinger, points to the wealth and hospitality of a family of this name who flourished in the 16th and 17th century at Buxhall." [1]

Early Origins of the Copping family

The surname Copping was first found in Suffolk where they held a family seat from very early times. Records from the year 1290 showed Greffrey Coppinger and Walter Coppinger in Waketown, Norfolk. Roger Coppinger of Waketun is listed in Norfolk in that same era, in the Rotuli Hundredorum. Other early records of the name include Seman Copinger, listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk in 1327; William Copenger listed in the Feet of Fines of Suffolk in 1383; and William Copynger, listed in the Feet of Fines of Essex in 1489. [2]

Important Dates for the Copping family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Copping research. Another 180 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1503, 1513, 1512, 1532, 1626, 1604, 1603, 1621, 1675, 1436, 1416, 1411, 1412, 1415, 1416, 1547, 1583, 1646, 1659, 1592, 1592, 1319 and 1797 are included under the topic Early Copping History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Copping Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Copping are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Copping include Coppinger, Coppenger, Copenger, Copinger, Coppynger, Copinsher and many more.

Early Notables of the Copping family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: William Copinger (d. 1436), who became the parson (rector) of Buxhall in 1416. He was a member of a family settled at Buxhall, Suffolk. His will is dated 20 Jan. 1411-1412, and was proved on 2 March 1415-1416. He was buried at Buxhall. [3] Sir Ralph Copinger, of Suffolk, was knighted on the battlefield at on Muckleburgh, in 1547, fighting against the Scots. John Coppin or Copping (d. 1583), was a Brownist, who lived in Bury St. Edmunds. He enthusiastically accepted the teachings of Robert Browne; preached Browne's doctrines in his native town...
Another 195 words (14 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Copping Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Copping family to Ireland

Some of the Copping family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 65 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Copping migration to the United States

Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Copping, or a variant listed above:

Copping Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Edward Copping, who landed in Maryland in 1650 [4]
  • James Copping, who landed in Virginia in 1662 [4]
  • John Copping, who arrived in Virginia in 1664 [4]
  • John Copping, who landed in Maryland in 1671 [4]
  • Henry Copping, who arrived in Maryland in 1675 [4]

Copping migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Copping Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Robert Copping, aged 27, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "Chatham" [5]

Copping migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Copping Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Martha Copping, aged 32, a nurse, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Conflict" in 1874
  • James Copping, aged 27, a painter, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Golden Sea" in 1874
  • Amy Copping, aged 22, a housemaid, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Rangitikei" in 1884

Contemporary Notables of the name Copping (post 1700)

    Historic Events for the Copping family

    RMS Lusitania
    • Mr. George Robert Copping, Canadian 1st Class Passenger from Toronto, Ontario, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking and was recovered [6]
    • Mrs. Emma Louisa Copping, (née Black), Canadian 1st Class Passenger from Toronto, Ontario, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [6]

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    Citations

    1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
    2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
    3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
    4. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
    5. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) CHATHAM 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/chatham1852.shtml.
    6. ^ Lusitania Passenger List - The Lusitania Resource. (Retrieved 2014, March 6) . Retrieved from http://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania-passenger-list/
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