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Comber History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Comber is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from a family once having lived in a small valley. The surname Comber is derived from the Old English word cumb, which means valley. The surname Comber belongs to the large class of Anglo-Saxon topographic surnames, which were given to people who resided near physical features such as hills, streams, churches, or types of trees.

Early Origins of the Comber family


The surname Comber was first found in Sussex where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

Early History of the Comber family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Comber research.
Another 143 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1260, 1296, 1575, 1653, 1631, 1645, 1645, 1699 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Comber History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Comber Spelling Variations


The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Comber has been recorded under many different variations, including Comber, Comer, Commber, Commer, Combers, Commers and others.

Early Notables of the Comber family (pre 1700)


Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Comber Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Comber family to Ireland


Some of the Comber family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 51 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Comber family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Comber or a variant listed above:

Comber Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • John, Michael, Martin, and Patrick Comber, all, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the early 1800's, and then proceeded inland to settle in many parts of America

Comber Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Mr. Jacob Comber U.E. who settled in Ernestown, Lennox & Addington, Ontario c. 1783 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  • Mr. Paul Comber U.E. who settled in Ernestown, Lennox & Addington, Ontario c. 1783 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  • Mr. Thomas Comber U.E. who settled in Ernestown, Lennox & Addington, Ontario c. 1783 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

Comber Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mr. Thomas Comber, aged 40 who emigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Syria" Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle on 21st May 1847 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 19)

Contemporary Notables of the name Comber (post 1700)


  • John William Comber M.M. (1906-1998), American-born Catholic missionary and bishop
  • John Howard Comber (1861-1903), English cricketer
  • Michael Andrew Comber (b. 1989), English cricketer
  • Robert Comber (1816-1858), English cricketer who played for Surrey
  • Bobbie Comber (1886-1942), English comedian, singer and acto, active from 1904 to 1941
  • Harold Frederick Comber ALS (1897-1969), English horticulturist and plant collector
  • Mick Comber (1903-1975), former Australian rules footballer who played with Melbourne in the Victorian Football League
  • Kenneth "Ken" Mark Comber (1939-1998), New Zealand politician of the National Party, Member of Parliament for Wellington Central (1972-1981)
  • Jack Comber (1919-1992), Australian politician, Member of the Australian Parliament for Bowman (1961-1963)
  • James "Jim" Boughtwood Comber (1929-2005), Scottish horticulturalist, son of Harold Frederick Comber

Historic Events for the Comber family



HMS Hood

  • Mr. James D Comber (b. 1914), English Leading Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Pulborough, Sussex, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm

HMS Royal Oak

  • Albert Edward Benjamin Comber (1908-1939), British Petty Officer with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk; he died in the sinking [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html

The Comber Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sapiens dominabitur astris
Motto Translation: A wise man can rule the stars.


Comber Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 19)
  3. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  4. ^ Ships hit by U-boats crew list HMS Royal Oak (08) - (Retrieved 2018 February, 9th) - retrieved from https://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/ship68.html

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