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The ancient name of Chylde finds its origins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It comes from a name for a military officer in the 10th century, probably comparable to a modern sergeant. In the Old English, it was rendered cild, which meant child. It was applied to the rank above the common soldier in that period, probably because they were in charge of "children." Later, in the 13th and 14th centuries, it came to denote a young man in training for the knighthood.

Early Origins of the Chylde family


The surname Chylde was first found in Hertfordshire. However, some of the family were found at Wanstead in Essex in later years. "The village is situated on the borders of Waltham Forest, near the main road from London to Cambridge; and is principally worthy of note as the site of Wanstead House, built in 1715, by Sir Richard (son of Sir Josiah) Child, created Viscount Castlemain in 1718, and Earl of Tylney in 1731. This splendid mansion was considerably enlarged and embellished by his descendants, and was surrounded by a very extensive park, laid out with great taste, and interspersed with gardens, pleasure-grounds, and grottos." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Early History of the Chylde family

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Early History of the Chylde family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Chylde research.
Another 295 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1086, 1280, 1379, 1784, 1606, 1697, 1660, 1697, 1690, 1630, 1699, 1673, 1677, 1703, 1702, 1703, 1642, 1713, 1698, 1702, 1705, 1708, 1674, 1721, 1713, 1715 and 1715 are included under the topic Early Chylde History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Chylde Spelling Variations

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Chylde Spelling Variations


Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Chylde family name include Child, Childe, Childs, Childes and others.

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Early Notables of the Chylde family (pre 1700)

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Early Notables of the Chylde family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include William Child (1606-1697), an English composer and organist, First Organist of the Chapel Royal (1660-1697); Sir John Child, 1st Baronet (died 1690), Governor of Bombay, first governor-general of the British settlements in India; Sir Josiah Child of Wanstead, 1st Baronet (1630-1699), English merchant...
Another 82 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Chylde Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Chylde family to the New World and Oceana

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Migration of the Chylde family to the New World and Oceana


For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Chylde surname or a spelling variation of the name include : Joseph Childs who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, and became a freeman in 1654. Benjamin Childs of Roxbury, Massachusetts, lived at what is now Brookline, Massachusetts. Benjamin's son Ephraim was killed by the Indians at Northfield on September 4th in the year 1675.

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Chylde Family Crest Products

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See Also

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Citations

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Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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