Campion History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Campion is one of the many new names that came to England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Campion is for a professional champion. In the Middle Ages a common manner of settling disputes was through trial by combat. Thus, proficient fighters would sell their services to represent parties involved in such cases by fighting on their behalf. The word derives from the Anglo Norman French word, campion, of the same meaning. [1] [2]

Early Origins of the Campion family

The surname Campion was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 where Beatrix le Campiun, Cambridgeshire; John Campiown, Huntingdonshire; and Walter le Campion, Buckinghamshire were listed as holding lands at that time. A few years later, the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Simon Campion and Ricardus Campion. [3]

Further to the north in Scotland, Nicholas Champion of Berwick rendered homage to King Edward I in 1291, and again as Nicol Campyon of Berwickshire in 1296. [4]

Early History of the Campion family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Campion research. Another 84 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1250, 1296, 1291, 1540, 1581, 1599, 1665, 1624, 1640, 1619, 1640, 1702, 1689, 1698, 1701, 1701, 1702, 1569, 1578, 1590, 1608 and 1659 are included under the topic Early Campion History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Campion Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Campion, Champion and others.

Early Notables of the Campion family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Edmund Campion (1540-1581), English Jesuit, son of a citizen and bookseller of London. During his illustrious career, he mingled with royalty many times but is most famous for his book The History of Ireland." [5] William Campion alias Wigmore (1599-1665), was another Jesuit, "a native of Herefordshire, entered the Society of Jesus at Watten, near St. Omer, in 1624, and became a professed father in 1640. " [5] Thomas Campion (d. 1619), was an early "physician, poet, and musician, was probably...
Another 86 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Campion Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Campion family to Ireland

Some of the Campion family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 143 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Campion migration to the United States +

To escape the political and religious persecution within England at the time, many English families left for the various British colonies abroad. The voyage was extremely difficult, though, and the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving. But for those who made it, the trip was most often worth it. Many of the families who arrived went on to make valuable contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families reveals a number of immigrants bearing the name Campion or a variant listed above:

Campion Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Jean Campion who settled in Virginia in 1621 with his wife and four children, and his brother Philip and his wife and one child
  • Richard Campion, who landed in Virginia in 1622 [6]
  • Robert Campion, who settled in Virginia in 1624
  • Robert Campion, who landed in Virginia in 1624-1625 [6]
  • William Campion, who landed in Virginia in 1658 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Campion Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Robert Campion, who arrived in America in 1760-1763 [6]
  • German Campion, aged 29, who landed in Virginia in 1773 [6]
Campion Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Catharine Campion, who arrived in New York, NY in 1836 [6]
  • Bridget Campion, aged 35, who landed in New York in 1854 [6]
  • Bridget Campion, who arrived in New York in 1854
  • Alice Campion, aged 3, who arrived in New York in 1862 [6]
  • James Campion, aged 7, who arrived in New York in 1862 [6]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Campion Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • A. Campion, aged 30, who immigrated to the United States from London, England, in 1906
  • Anna Campion, aged 25, who landed in America from Freshford, Ireland, in 1909
  • Annie Campion, aged 36, who immigrated to the United States from Abbeylein, Ireland, in 1909
  • Andrew Campion, aged 34, who landed in America from London, England, in 1910
  • Arthur Campion, aged 35, who immigrated to the United States from London, England, in 1912
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Campion migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Campion Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Mr. Pierre Campion, (b. 1613), aged 30, French settler travelling to Canada for work arriving on 6th April 1643 [7]
Campion Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Arthur G. Campion, who settled in Ontario in 1871
Campion Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • Adelaide E. Campion, aged 62, who immigrated to Belleville, Ontario, Canada in 1911

Australia Campion migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Campion Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Ellen Campion, aged 27, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Lismoyne"
  • James Campion, aged 18, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship "Nimroud"
  • Patrick Campion, aged 44, a farm labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Navarino" [8]
  • Catherine Campion, aged 15, a servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Navarino" [8]

New Zealand Campion migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Campion Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Miss Maria Campion, (b. 1855), aged Infant, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sir Edward Paget" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 2nd July 1856 [9]
  • Mr. George Emblen Campion, (b. 1829), aged 27, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sir Edward Paget" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 2nd July 1856 [9]
  • Mrs. Anne Hannah Campion, (b. 1833), aged 23, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sir Edward Paget" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 2nd July 1856 [9]
  • Mr. John Campion, (b. 1855), aged 1, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Sir Edward Paget" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 2nd July 1856 [9]
  • E.J. Campion, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Asterope" in 1861
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Campion (post 1700) +

  • John Joseph Campion (1963-2020), Irish-born, American entrepreneur who founded Showpower, Inc., a California company that provided portable generators for comcerts
  • Washington Lee Campion, American Democrat politician, Candidate in primary for U.S. Representative from West Virginia 2nd District, 1946 [10]
  • Thomas H. Campion, American Democrat politician, Candidate for Presidential Elector for New York, 1900 [10]
  • John P. Campion, American politician, Warden (borough president) of Unionville, Connecticut, 1926 [10]
  • James W. Campion, American Democrat politician, Candidate for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Hanover, 1938; Delegate to New Hampshire State Constitutional Convention from Hanover, 1956 [10]
  • James Campion Jr., American Democrat politician, Candidate for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Hanover, 1956 [10]
  • James Campion, American Democrat politician, Chair of Schuylkill County Democratic Party, 1927; Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1928 [10]
  • Emmett Campion, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from California, 1952 [10]
  • Cassie Campion (b. 1972), English squash player
  • Paul Campion (b. 1969), Australian radio host and a two-time recipient of the Australian Commercial Radio Award
  • ... (Another 4 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ Debien, Gabriel. Liste Des Engagés Pour Le Canada Au XVIIe Siècle. Vol. 6, Laval University, 1952. (Retreived 24th May 2018). Retrieved from https://lebloguedeguyperron.wordpress.com/2016/06/30/130-liste-des-contrats-dengagement-pour-la-nouvelle-france-releves-a-la-rochelle-entre-1634-et-1679/
  8. ^ South Australian Register. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Navarino 1857. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/navarino1857.shtml.
  9. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  10. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 19) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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