Brookes History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Brookes was brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Brookes family lived in Essex. The name, however, derives from the family's former residence in Broc, in the area of Anjou, France. [1]

Early Origins of the Brookes family

The surname Brookes was first found in Essex. Medieval forms of the name are Ate-Broc, Atte-Broc, Attenbroke and was more often than not pluralized to Brooks and Brookes in modern times. [2]

Originally from the Norman "Broc," meaning "a stream" or "at the brook," one of the first references was of Robert le Broc and Ranyllph le Broc, two knights having estates in Essex in the year 1119. A few years later, Eustace delbroc was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Northumberland in 1130 and Rand de Broc was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Hampshire in 1157. [3]

The Testa de Nevill, sive Liber Feodorum, temp. Henry III- Edward I, listed Edelina del Brok. Henry III- Edward I [4]

Early in the 13th century, William de la Broke was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls of Surrey in 1208 and Emma de Brokes was listed in the same source but in Suffolk in 1220. [3] The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list Alice de la Broke and Laurence del Broc. [5] In Somerset, William atte Brouke was listed there, 1 Edward III (during the first year of King Edward III's reign.) [6]

Early History of the Brookes family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Brookes research. Another 204 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1214, 1592, 1660, 1512, 1560, 1532, 1560, 1569, 1563, 1545, 1660, 1614, 1643, 1664, 1602, 1655, 1652, 1608, 1680, 1685, 1646, 1648, 1632, 1676, 1601, 1683, 1685 and are included under the topic Early Brookes History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Brookes Spelling Variations

Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Brook, Brooke, Brookes, Brooks, Brecks, Broocks and others.

Early Notables of the Brookes family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Richard Brooke (died 1569), Sheriff of Cheshire in 1563, he bought the manor of Norton, Cheshire from Henry VIII in 1545 following the dissolution of the monasteries; John Brooke, (died 1660) 1st Baron Cobham, an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1643; Sir Henry Brooke, 1st Baronet (died 1664), an English soldier and politician; Robert Brooke, Sr...
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Brookes Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Brookes Ranking

In the United States, the name Brookes is the 13,339th most popular surname with an estimated 2,487 people with that name. [7] However, in the United Kingdom, the name Brookes is ranked the 386th most popular surname with an estimated 16,634 people with that name. [8]

Ireland Migration of the Brookes family to Ireland

Some of the Brookes family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 124 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Brookes migration to the United States +

Many English families emigrated to North American colonies in order to escape the political chaos in Britain at this time. Unfortunately, many English families made the trip to the New World under extremely harsh conditions. Overcrowding on the ships caused the majority of the immigrants to arrive diseased, famished, and destitute from the long journey across the stormy Atlantic. Despite these hardships, many of the families prospered and went on to make invaluable contributions to the development of the cultures of the United States and Canada. Early North American immigration records have revealed a number of people bearing the name Brookes or a variant listed above:

Brookes Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Cutbert Brookes, who arrived in Virginia in 1622 [9]
  • Alice Brookes, aged 18, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [9]
  • Jo Brookes, aged 12, who arrived in Bermuda in 1635 [9]
  • William Brookes, aged 17, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [9]
  • Mr. Richard Brookes, (b. 1615), aged 20, British settler traveling aboard the ship "Safety" arriving in Virginia in 1635 [10]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Brookes Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Robert Brookes, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [9]
  • Hester Brookes, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [9]
  • Benja Brookes, who arrived in Virginia in 1713 [9]
  • Lydia Brookes, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [9]
  • Mary Brookes, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [9]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Brookes migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Brookes Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Thomas Brookes, who landed in Quebec in 1784

Australia Brookes migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Brookes Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Thomas Brookes, English convict who was convicted in Warwick, Warwickshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Dromedary" on 11th September 1819, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [11]
  • Charles Brookes, English convict from Sussex, who was transported aboard the "Albion" on May 17, 1823, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [12]
  • Mr. Joseph Brookes, English convict who was convicted in Warwick, Warwickshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Champion" on 24th May 1827, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [13]
  • Mr. Silas Brookes, English convict who was convicted in London, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Champion" on 24th May 1827, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [13]
  • Mr. William Brookes, English convict who was convicted in Somerset, England for life for house breaking, transported aboard the "Claudine" on 19th August 1829, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [14]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

New Zealand Brookes migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Brookes Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Brookes, who landed in Nelson, New Zealand in 1840
  • W. Brookes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship 'Merchantman' arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand and Auckland New Zealand on 6th September 1855 [15]
  • Mr. Thomas Brookes, (b. 1840), aged 18, English ploughman from Sussex travelling from Gravesend aboard the ship "Zealandia" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 21st September 1858 [16]
  • Miss Mary H. Brookes, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "England" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand on 6th February 1867 [15]
  • Mr. Brookes, American settler travelling from San Francisco aboard the ship "Nevada" arriving in Port Chalmers, Dunedin, Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 10th May 1871 [15]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

West Indies Brookes migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [17]
Brookes Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Richard Brookes, aged 16, who landed in St Christopher in 1635 [9]
  • Mr. Richard Brookes, (b. 1619), aged 16, British settler traveling aboard the ship "Matthew" arriving in St Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635 [18]
  • Mr. Thomas Brookes, (b. 1614), aged 21, British settler traveling aboard the ship "William and John" arriving in St Christopher (Saint Kitts) in 1635 [18]

Contemporary Notables of the name Brookes (post 1700) +

  • James H. Brookes D. D. (1830-1897), American religious writer
  • John Andrew Brookes MBE (1933-2018), English garden and landscape designer who designed thousands of gardens and taught and lectured about horticulture
  • Edwin Stanley Brookes Jr. (1840-1904), English-born surveyor in the settlement of New Zealand during the mid-late 19th century
  • Andrew Phillip Brookes (b. 1969), former English cricketer
  • Stephanie Clare Brookes (b. 1980), English author
  • Dane Brookes (b. 1984), English writer and actor
  • Sydney "Syd" Brookes (b. 1907), English professional footballer
  • John Brookes (b. 1945), retired English football forward
  • Captain Eric Guy Brookes (1894-1918), English World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories, recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross
  • Andrew Brookes, English aerospace analyst, author of aviation books
  • ... (Another 7 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Hillsborough disaster
  • Andrew Brookes (1962-1989), English car worker who was attending the FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield, Yorkshire when the stand allocated area became overcrowded and 96 people were crushed in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster and he died from his injuries [19]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Donald A Brookes (b. 1923), English Telegraphist serving for the Royal Navy from Streatham, London, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [20]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Frank Brookes, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [21]
  • Mr. Ben Brookes, British Leading Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [21]


The Brookes Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Perseverando
Motto Translation: By persevering.


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Testa de Nevill or "Liber Feodorum" or "Book of Fees," thought to have been written by Ralph de Nevill, for King John (1199–1216)
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  7. ^ https://namecensus.com/most_common_surnames.htm
  8. ^ https://www.surnamemap.eu/unitedkingdom/surnames_ranking.php?p=10
  9. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  10. ^ Pilgrim Ship's of 1600's (Retrieved October 5th 2021, retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  11. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 16th July 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/dromedary
  12. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2016, October 27) Albion voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1823 with 200 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/albion/1823
  13. ^ Convict Records of Australia (Retreived 18th January 2021, retreived from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/champion)
  14. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 18th February 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/claudine
  15. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  16. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  17. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  18. ^ Pilgrim Ship's of 1600's (Retrieved October 4th 2021, retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)
  19. ^ Hillsborough Victims (retreived 21st March 2021). Retreived from https://metro.co.uk/2019/04/15/remembering-96-victims-hillsborough-disaster-30-years-9206566/
  20. ^ H.M.S. Hood Association-Battle Cruiser Hood: Crew Information - H.M.S. Hood Rolls of Honour, Men Lost in the Sinking of H.M.S. Hood, 24th May 1941. (Retrieved 2016, July 15) . Retrieved from http://www.hmshood.com/crew/memorial/roh_24may41.htm
  21. ^ HMS Prince of Wales Crew members. (Retrieved 2014, April 9) . Retrieved from http://www.forcez-survivors.org.uk/biographies/listprincecrew.html


Houseofnames.com on Facebook
Shipping
Fastest Delivery Possible

Digital Products on Checkout, all other products filled in 1 business day

Money Back
Money Back Guarantee

Yes, all products 100% Guaranteed

Support
BBB A+ Rating

The Best Rating possible

Payment
Secure Online Payment

Entire site uses SSL / Secure Certificate