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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2015

Origins Available: French, German, Irish, Scottish

Where did the Scottish Barry family come from? What is the Scottish Barry family crest and coat of arms? When did the Barry family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Barry family history?

The story of the Barry family is rich with Scottish history. It begins in the ancient kingdom of Dalriada where Barry evolved as a name for some who lived in Barry, in Angus in mid-west Scotland. The place-name Barry, often spelled Barrie, is derived from the Gaelic word borrach, which means "rough, grassy hill."

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Historical recordings of the name Barry include many spelling variations. They include They are the result of repeated translations of the name from Gaelic to English and inconsistencies in spelling rules. Barry, Barrie, Barre, Barrey, Barree and others.

First found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where they have held territories from very ancient times.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barry research. Another 215 words(15 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1495, 1658, 1713 and are included under the topic Early Barry History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 27 words(2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barry Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Barry family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 133 words(10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Scottish settlers arrived in many of the communities that became the backbones of the United States and Canada. Many stayed, but some headed west for the endless open country of the prairies. In the American War of Independence, many Scots who remained loyal to England re-settled in Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Scots across North America were able to recover much of their lost heritage in the 20th century as Clan societies and highland games sprang up across North America. Early immigration and passenger lists have documented some of the first Barrys to arrive on North American shores:

Barry Settlers in United States in the 17th Century


  • David Barry, who landed in Virginia in 1622
  • Clement Barry, who landed in St Christopher in 1633
  • Clement Barry who settled in St. Christopher in 1633
  • Clement Barry, who settled in St. Christopher in 1633
  • Garratt Barry, who settled in Virginia in 1651


Barry Settlers in United States in the 18th Century


  • Jno Barry, who landed in Virginia in 1714
  • William Barry settled in South Carolina in 1716
  • Jean Barry, aged 33, arrived in Louisiana in 1719
  • Charles Barry, who arrived in Virginia in 1720
  • James Bryan Barry, who arrived in Virginia in 1732


Barry Settlers in United States in the 19th Century


  • Francis Barry, who arrived in America in 1802
  • Ann Barry, who arrived in America in 1806
  • Elnr Barry, who landed in America in 1806
  • Lawrence Barry, aged 33, landed in New York in 1812
  • Betsey Barry, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1813


Barry Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century


  • Mr. Lewis Barry U.E who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783
  • Mr. Samuel Barry U.E who arrived in Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 387 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York
  • Mr. Thomas Barry U.E who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783

Barry Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century


  • David Barry, from Waterglass Hill, County Cork, was married in St. John's in 1803
  • Fanny and John Barry both of whom arrived in Canada in 1823
  • Edmond Barry, aged 41, landed in Canada in 1823
  • John St. Lawrence Barry, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1827
  • William Barry, aged 25, a labourer, arrived in Saint John, NB in 1833 aboard the barque "Pallas" from Cork


Barry Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century


  • James Barry, a bricklayer, arrived in Van Diemenís Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Alexander Barry, a cabinet-maker, arrived in Van Diemenís Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Edmund Barry arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Britannia" in 1846
  • Honora Barry arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Britannia" in 1846
  • Thomas Barry arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Canton" in 1846


Barry Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century


  • Edward Barry landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1840
  • John Barry landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Aurora
  • Richard Barry landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Aurora
  • William Barry landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Aurora
  • John Barry, aged 29, a gardener, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Aurora" in 1840


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  • Philip Barry (1896-1949), American dramatist
  • Patrick Barry (1816-1890), horticulturist, who arrived in America at age 24, and was an important influence in the beginnings of fruit growing in America
  • Denis Barry (1929-2003), American president of the United States Chess Federation from 1993 to 1996
  • Dave Barry (b. 1947), American author and columnist, who wrote a nationally syndicated humor column for the The Miami Herald from 1983 to 2005 and who won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary
  • Gene Barry (1919-2009), award-winning American film, stage, and television actor
  • William Logan Barry (b. 1926), American lawyer
  • Raymond John Barry (b. 1939), American film, television and stage actor
  • Dierdre Demet "Dede" Barry (b. 1972), American female cycle racer, six times U.S. champion
  • Daniel Thomas Barry M.D., PH.D. (b. 1953), former NASA Astronaut logging over 734 hours in space
  • Ellen Barry, American co-winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting

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  • Descendants of John Ambrose Rowe (including the Barry Family), Weld County Pioneer, 1828-1886 by Arliss S. Monk.
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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Regi legi fidelis
Motto Translation: Faithful to king and law.

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  1. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
  2. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
  3. Donaldson, Gordon and Robert S. Morpeth. Who's Who In Scotish History. Wales: Welsh Academic Press, 1996. Print. (ISBN 186057-0054).
  4. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
  5. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  6. Urquhart, Blair Edition. Tartans The New Compact Study Guide and Identifier. Secauccus, NJ: Chartwell Books, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0-7858-0050-6).
  7. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
  8. Bain, Robert. The Clans and Tartans of Scotland. Glasgow & London: Collins, 1968. Print. (ISBN 000411117-6).
  9. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Scotch Irish Pioneers In Ulster and America. Montana: Kessinger Publishing. Print.
  10. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  11. ...

The Barry Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Barry Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 16 April 2015 at 19:36.

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