Mark History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms 

Cornwall, one of the original six "Celtic nations" is the homeland to the surname Mark. A revival of the Cornish language which began in the 9th century AD has begun. No doubt this was the language spoken by distant forebears of the Mark family. Though surnames became common during medieval times, English people were formerly known only by a single name. The way in which hereditary surnames were adopted in medieval England is fascinating. Many Cornish surnames appear to be topographic surnames, which were given to people who resided near physical features such as hills, streams, churches, or types of trees, many are actually habitation surnames. The name Mark is a local type of surname and the Mark family lived on a boundary between two districts. The surname Mark is a topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature. During the Middle Ages, as society became more complex, individuals needed a way to be distinguishable from others. Toponymic surnames were developed as a result of this need. Various features in the geography of the area were used to distinguish people from one another.

Early Origins of the Mark family

The surname Mark was first found in Cornwall where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Important Dates for the Mark family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mark research. Another 81 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Mark History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mark Spelling Variations

Cornish surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The official court languages, which were Latin and French, were also influential on the spelling of a surname. Since the spelling of surnames was rarely consistent in medieval times, and scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings of their surname in the ancient chronicles. Moreover, a large number of foreign names were brought into England, which accelerated and accentuated the alterations to the spelling of various surnames. Lastly, spelling variations often resulted from the linguistic differences between the people of Cornwall and the rest of England. The Cornish spoke a unique Brythonic Celtic language which was first recorded in written documents during the 10th century. However, they became increasingly Anglicized, and Cornish became extinct as a spoken language in 1777, although it has been revived by Cornish patriots in the modern era. The name has been spelled Mark, Marks, Markes, Marke and others.

Early Notables of the Mark family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Mark Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mark family to Ireland

Some of the Mark family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 78 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mark migration to the United States

Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Mark were

Mark Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Andrew Mark, who settled in Virginia in 1654 along with Elizabeth and Sarah
  • Margaret Mark, who landed in Maryland in 1658 [1]
Mark Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Mathew Mark, who arrived in Virginia in 1717 [1]
  • Johan Diterig Mark, who settled in Philadelphia in 1740
  • Michael Mark, who settled in Philadelphia in 1741
  • Michael Mark, aged 45, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1741 [1]
  • Conrad Mark, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1760 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Mark Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Samuel Mark, aged 34, who landed in Louisiana in 1813 [1]
  • Adrian Rudolph Mark, aged 40, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1823 [1]
  • Balthasar Mark went to Texas in 1845
  • Joseph Mark, who arrived in New York in 1845 [1]
  • Andrew Mark, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1848 [1]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Mark migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Mark Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Mrs. Ellen Mark, aged 40 who immigrated to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship "Free Trader" departing from the port of Liverpool, England but died on Grosse Isle in September 1847 [2]

Mark migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Mark Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Henry Mark, aged 18, a copper miner, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship "Tantivy"

Mark migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Mark Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • S Mark, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1844
  • Henry Mark, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Annie Wilson" in 1863
  • Fanny Mark, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Annie Wilson" in 1863
  • Edith A. Mark, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Annie Wilson" in 1863
  • Miss Margaret Mark, (b. 1848), aged 20, British dairymaid travelling from London aboard the ship "Matoaka" arriving in Lyttelton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 8th February 1869 [3]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Mark (post 1700)

  • Donald J. Mark (1926-2018), American jurist, Judge on the New York Supreme Court from 1983 to 1997
  • Michael Mark (1886-1975), Russian-born American film actor who appeared in over 120 films
  • Michael Mark, American Drama Desk Award winning, Grammy Award nominated musician, composer, and actor
  • Herman Mark (1895-1992), Austrian-American chemist and winner of the 1979 Wolf Prize in Chemistry
  • Michael Mark, Grenadian football defender for the Grenada national football team
  • Peter Mark Roget (1779-1869), English physician, born in Broad Street, Soho, London; creator of the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases (Roget's Thesaurus)
  • Mr. Stephen Mark Saunders M.B.E.,, British recipient of Member of the Order of the British Empire on 8th June 2018, for services to the Telecommunications Industry and Business [4]
  • Mr. Alexander Mark Nileshwar O.B.E.,, British Senior Professional for Special Projects Delivery Team, was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire on 8th June 2018, for services to Military Capability [5]
  • Saul Mark Rosen (1953-1988), American businessman from Morris Plains, New Jersey, America, who flew aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, known as the Lockerbie bombing in 1988 and died
  • Llewelyn Mark Summers (1947-2019), New Zealand sculptor based in Christchurch, New Zealand

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Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 41)
  3. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 17th October 2018). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  4. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62310, 4 July 2019 | London Gazette, The Gazette, June 2018, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/62310/supplement/B1
  5. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62507, 28 December 2018 | London Gazette, The Gazette, Dec. 2018, www.thegazette.co.uk/honours-lists
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