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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2017


The ancestors of the Wry surname lived among the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. The name comes from when they lived as a local name for a secluded nook or corner of land, derived from the Old Norse word "vra" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
. The second possible origin was as a nickname for a person with twisted or crooked features.

Wry Early Origins



The surname Wry was first found in Lancashire where Wray is a small village, part of the civil parish of Wray-with-Botton and in 2001 had a population of 521. This village dates back to at least 1227 when the village was named Wra. There is also a Wray in High Cumbria complete with Wray Castle which dates back to c. 1535 when it was spelled Wraye and a Wrea Green in Lancashire which dates back the farthest in 1201 with the spelling of Wra. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
This latter reference is larger of the two Lancashire references as in 2001, 1600 people lived there. The Domesday Book lists the name Wray (spelled Werei) [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
as land held by Godwine in Devon and comprised land for 6 ploughs, 8 acres of meadows and 5 acres of pasture. And it is in Devon that Robert le Wrey who lived in the second year of King Stephen (1136-1137) and whose son was seated at Wrey, in parish of Moreton-Hamstead claimed their origins. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

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Wry Spelling Variations


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Wry Spelling Variations



Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Wry include Wray, Wraye, Wrey, Wreye and others.

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Wry Early History


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Wry Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wry research. Another 265 words (19 lines of text) covering the years 1611, 1555, 1617, 1660, 1626, 1669, 1524, 1592, 1555, 1617, 1592, 1586, 1655, 1601, 1646, 1625, 1669, 1645, 1660, 1619, 1664, 1654, 1653, 1696 and are included under the topic Early Wry History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Wry Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Wry Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Christopher Wray (1524-1592), an English judge and Chief Justice of the King’s Bench; Sir William Wray, 1st Baronet, of Glentworth, Lincolnshire (c 1555-1617), English politician, appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1592; Sir John Wray, 2nd Baronet (1586-1655), English politician, supporter of...

Another 97 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wry Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Wry In Ireland


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Wry In Ireland



Some of the Wry family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 135 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wry Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • John Wry, aged 23, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1774

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: En juste et vray
Motto Translation: In justice and truth.


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Wry Family Crest Products


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Wry Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

Other References

  1. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  3. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  4. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  5. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
  6. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  7. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  8. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  9. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  10. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  11. ...

The Wry Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Wry Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 14 January 2015 at 15:46.

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