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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


From the historical and enchanting region of Scotland emerged a multitude of noble families, including the distinguished Whytt family. Originally, the Scottish people were known only by a single name. Scottish surnames evolved during the Middle Ages when people began to assume an extra name to avoid confusion and to further identify themselves. Often they adopted names that were derived from nicknames. Nickname surnames were derived from an eke-name, or added name. They usually reflected the physical characteristics or attributes of the first person that used the name. The name Whytt is a nickname type of surname for a pale or fair haired person. Further research revealed that the name is derived from the Old English word "hwit," meaning "white."

Whytt Early Origins



The surname Whytt was first found in at Coldingham, a village in Berwickshire an ancient county of Scotland, presently part of the Scottish Borders Council Area, located in the eastern part of the Borders Region of Scotland, where "Uuiaett Hwite" witnessed King Eadgar's charter of Coldingham, sometime between the years 1097 and 1107. It appears the name may have actually predated the Norman invasion as Old English personal names such as "Huita, Huuita, Hwita" are known to have predated 1066. One Old English charter dated before 925 (the Cartularium Saxonica), there is a "Wulfnoo hwita" listed. Whyte was also used as an Anglicized form of the Gaelic MacGhillebhain. By the mid 12th century, however, most of the bearers of this name in Scotland were of Norman descent. They held a family seat from very early times.

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Whytt Spelling Variations


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Whytt Spelling Variations



Spelling variations of this family name include: White, Whyte, Wight and others.

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Whytt Early History


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Whytt Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whytt research. Another 339 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1236, 1376, 1426, and 1658 are included under the topic Early Whytt History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Whytt Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Whytt Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Whytt Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Whytt In Ireland


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Whytt In Ireland



Some of the Whytt family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 110 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: William White and his wife Susannah, who immigrated to Plymouth in 1620 with their sons Resolve and Peregrine (who was born in Cape Cod Harbour on board the Mayflower in 1620.

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Contemporary Notables of the name Whytt (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Whytt (post 1700)



  • Robert Whytt (1714-1766), Scottish physician, President of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, known for his research on unconscious reflexes, tubercular meningitis, urinary bladder stones, and hysteria

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Labore parta
Motto Translation: Acquired by work.


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Whytt Family Crest Products


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Whytt Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
    2. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
    3. Holt, J.C. Ed. Domesday Studies. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1987. Print. (ISBN 0-85115-477-8).
    4. Leyburn, James Graham. The Scotch-Irish A Social History. Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 1962. Print. (ISBN 0807842591).
    5. Browne, James. The History of Scotland it's Highlands, Regiments and Clans 8 Volumes. Edinburgh: Francis A Niccolls & Co, 1909. Print.
    6. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
    7. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
    8. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
    9. Warner, Philip Warner. Famous Scottish Battles. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1996. Print. (ISBN 0-76070-004-4).
    10. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. The Charters of David I The Written Acts of David I King of Scots, 1124-53 and of His Son Henry, Earl of Northumerland, 1139-52. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999. Print.
    11. ...

    The Whytt Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Whytt Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 31 March 2014 at 09:33.

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