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Whitte History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: English-Alt, English, Irish, Scottish


From the historical and enchanting region of Scotland emerged a multitude of noble families, including the distinguished Whitte family. Originally, the Scottish people were known only by a single name. Scottish surnames evolved during the Middle Ages when people began to assume an extra name to avoid confusion and to further identify themselves. Often they adopted names that were derived from nicknames. Nickname surnames were derived from an eke-name, or added name. They usually reflected the physical characteristics or attributes of the first person that used the name. The name Whitte is a nickname type of surname for a pale or fair haired person. Further research revealed that the name is derived from the Old English word "hwit," meaning "white."

Early Origins of the Whitte family


The surname Whitte was first found in at Coldingham, a village in Berwickshire an ancient county of Scotland, presently part of the Scottish Borders Council Area, located in the eastern part of the Borders Region of Scotland, where "Uuiaett Hwite" witnessed King Eadgar's charter of Coldingham, sometime between the years 1097 and 1107. It appears the name may have actually predated the Norman invasion as Old English personal names such as "Huita, Huuita, Hwita" are known to have predated 1066. One Old English charter dated before 925 (the Cartularium Saxonica), there is a "Wulfnoo hwita" listed. Whyte was also used as an Anglicized form of the Gaelic MacGhillebhain. By the mid 12th century, however, most of the bearers of this name in Scotland were of Norman descent. They held a family seat from very early times.

Early History of the Whitte family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whitte research.
Another 339 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1236, 1376, 1426, and 1658 are included under the topic Early Whitte History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Whitte Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: White, Whyte, Wight and others.

Early Notables of the Whitte family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Whitte Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Whitte family to Ireland


Some of the Whitte family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 110 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Whitte family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Whitte Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • John Whitte, who arrived in Maryland in 1665-1666 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Whitte Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Bess Whitte, aged 21, who landed in New York in 1854 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Suggested Readings for the name Whitte


  • Genealogy of Whittemore Family by D.S. Zimmer.
  • The Whittemore Family in America by Bradford Adams Whittemore.
  • McLean, the Family of Judge Alney and Tabitha McLean Of Greenville, Kentucky by Sally Stone Trotter.

The Whitte Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Labore parta
Motto Translation: Acquired by work.


Whitte Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

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