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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Origins Available: English, German


The origins of the name Warner are from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from Warnier, a Germanic personal name. It is composed of two elements: warin, which means guard; and hari, which means soldier. Such militaristic names were popular in the early Middle Ages in Europe, which is not surprising given that Europe was in a semi-permanent state of warfare throughout the Middle Ages.

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The surname Warner was first found in Leicestershire where they were recorded in the Domesday Book compiled in 1086 as Warnerus and Warnerius. [1]

Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Warner family name include Warner, Warnar, Warnere and others.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Warner research. Another 223 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1638, 1670, 1558, 1609, 1580, 1649, 1624, 1581, 1666, 1637, 1666, 1667, 1659, 1628, 1692, 1642, 1681, 1676, 1677 and 1813 are included under the topic Early Warner History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 179 words (13 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Warner Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Warner family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 43 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Warner surname or a spelling variation of the name include:

Warner Settlers in United States in the 17th Century


  • Augustine Warner, who arrived in Virginia in 1628
  • Andrew Warner settled in Nantasket Massachusetts in 1631
  • William Warner settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1631
  • Andrew Warner, who landed in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1632
  • Cyprian Warner settled in Virginia in 1635


Warner Settlers in United States in the 18th Century


  • Barbara Warner, who arrived in Virginia in 1714
  • Hendrich Warner, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1729
  • Johann Adam Warner arrived in Philadelphia in 1733
  • Andreas Warner, who came to Philadelphia in 1734
  • Henrick Warner, who landed in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania in 1741


Warner Settlers in United States in the 19th Century


  • Jeremiah Warner, aged 35, arrived in New York in 1800
  • Edward Warner, who arrived in New York in 1834
  • Christian Warner, who landed in Maryland in 1838
  • Freid Ludwig Warner came to Baltimore in 1840
  • George Warner, who landed in Somerset County, Pennsylvania in 1844


Warner Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century


  • Christopher Warner, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752

Warner Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century


  • Cyrus Warner, who arrived in Canada in 1830
  • Henry Warner, who arrived in Canada in 1831

Warner Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century


  • Francis Warner, English convict from Nottingham, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on July 3, 1822, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Austraila
  • Thomas Warner arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rapid" in 1838
  • William Warner arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Rapid" in 1838
  • Joseph James Warner arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Anna Robertson" in 1839
  • Mary Warner arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Anna Robertson" in 1839


Warner Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century


  • Richard Warner landed in Nelson, New Zealand in 1842
  • Richard Warner, aged 23, a blacksmith, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842
  • Eliza Warner, aged 23, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842
  • Richard Warner, aged 1, arrived in Nelson aboard the ship "Olympus" in 1842
  • Horatio Nelson Warner landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1843


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  • Jack Warner (b. 1940), American Major League Baseball pitcher
  • Harry Warner (1881-1958), American studio executive, one of the founders of Warner Bros. Studios
  • Aaron "Albert" Warner (1883-1967), Polish-born American film executive, one of the founders of Warner Bros. Studios
  • Matthew Warner, American politician, Member of New York State Assembly, 1819-20, 1823
  • Milo J. Warner, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Ohio, 1932, 1948, 1952, 1956
  • Monroe P. Warner, American Republican politician, Candidate for Governor of West Virginia, 2004
  • Obadiah Warner, American politician, Member of Connecticut State House of Representatives from Waterbury, 1821, 1823, 1833
  • Obadiah Warner, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Georgia, 1876
  • Orange Warner, American politician, Member of Connecticut State House of Representatives from New Milford, 1839
  • Osie F. Warner, American Republican politician, Member of West Virginia Republican State Executive Committee, 1937

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  • Warner Family History by Verle M. Arnold.
  • Ecroyd, Warner, and Morris Genealogy by Lewis Ecroyd Morris.
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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non nobis tantum nati
Motto Translation: We are not born for ourselves alone.

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  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Other References

  1. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  2. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  4. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  5. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  6. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  7. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  8. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  9. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  10. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  11. ...

The Warner Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Warner Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 4 March 2016 at 08:31.

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