Vasey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The vast movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of England of 1066 brought the Vasey family name to the British Isles. They lived in Northampton. The name, however, derives from the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, Vassy, Normandy. One of the first records of the name was Robertus Invesiatus, Lascivus which appeared in the Domesday Book [1] in Essex [2]. Other records show the name was originally De Vesci, which was a baronial name, a branch of the De Burgh family. [3]

Eustace de Vescy or Vesci, Baron Vesci (1170?-1216), "son of William de Vesci and Burga de Stuteville, paid his relief on coming of age in 2 Richard I (1191-1192). He was with the king in Palestine in 1195. John de Vescy (d. 1289) was eldest son of William de Vescy (d. 1253), and elder brother of William de Vescy. In 1253, on the death of his father in Gascony, he succeeded to the family estates. These included the barony of Alnwick and a large property in Northumberland." [4]

Early Origins of the Vasey family

The surname Vasey was first found in Northampton where Robert de Vassy (Veci) and his brother Ivo were granted nineteen Lordships in that county and overlapping into Warwick, Lincoln, and Leicester, by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

"The 'Sires de Waacie,' spoken of by Wace at the battle of Hastings, were Robert, who in 1086 held a great barony in Northants, Warwick, Lincoln, and Leicester; and Ivo, who does not appear even as a mesne-lord in Domesday. Yet we hear nothing more either of Robert or his possessions, and the whole history of the family centres on Ivo, and Ivo's posterity." [5]

Ivo (John) won the hand of Alda, daughter of Gilbert, Lord of Alnwick in Northumberland and the family claim considerable prominence as the Lords of Vesey from which Lords Fitzgerald and Vesei claim descent.

Further to the south in Tamerton, Cornwall, "Vacye was for some time the seat of a family of this name; but it is at present the property and residence of George Call, Esq. The church of Tamerton contains several memorials for the family of Vacye." [6]

Early History of the Vasey family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Vasey research. Another 204 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1313, 1500, 1589, 1661, 1462, 1554, 1470, 1674 and 1746 are included under the topic Early Vasey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Vasey Spelling Variations

A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Feasey, Feasy, Fessey, Fassey, Fessys, Fressis, Veasey, Vassey, Vassy, Vesci, Vezey, Vezay, Vesey, Vessey and many more.

Early Notables of the Vasey family (pre 1700)

Another 49 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Vasey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Vasey family to Ireland

Some of the Vasey family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 35 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Vasey migration to the United States +

Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Vasey or a variant listed above:

Vasey Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • William Vasey, who landed in New York in 1714-1715 [7]
Vasey Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Edwin Vasey, aged 30, who landed in America from London, in 1892
  • Florence Vasey, aged 7, who settled in America from Sunderland, in 1892
  • J. E. Vasey, aged 27, who immigrated to the United States from London, in 1892
  • John Vasey, aged 37, who immigrated to the United States from Sunderland, in 1892
Vasey Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • George W Vasey, aged 72, who landed in America from London, in 1904
  • Tom Vasey, aged 30, who landed in America from Harrogate, England, in 1911
  • James Vasey, aged 22, who settled in America from Ballyhannis, Ireland, in 1913
  • William Vasey, aged 40, who landed in America from Bootle, in 1919
  • William Vasey, aged 40, who settled in America from Southampton, in 1920
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Canada Vasey migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Vasey Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • Eureka Vasey, aged 32, who immigrated to St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1924
  • Julia Vasey, aged 56, who immigrated to St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1924

Australia Vasey migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Vasey Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Vasey, British convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia [8]

New Zealand Vasey migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Vasey Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Edward Vasey, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Alfred" in 1864 [9]
  • George Vasey, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Alfred" in 1864 [9]

Contemporary Notables of the name Vasey (post 1700) +

  • George Vasey (1822-1893), English-born, American botanist
  • William J. Vasey, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1996 [10]
  • Maude K. Vasey, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1944 (alternate), 1948 [10]
  • Judith L. Vasey, American Democratic Party politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Wyoming, 1996 [10]
  • Mrs. A. W. Vasey, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from California, 1940 [10]
  • Percy Vasey (1883-1952), English cricketer and schoolmaster
  • Major-General George Alan Vasey (1895-1945), Officer Commanding 7th Australian Infantry Division, New Guinea from 1943 to 1945 [11]
  • Jessie Mary Vasey CBE (1897-1966), Australian founder and President of the War Widows' Guild of Australia


The Vasey Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sub hoc signo vinces
Motto Translation: Under this sign we shall conquer.


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  5. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  6. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 25th November 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/calcutta
  9. ^ Archives New Zealand Micro 5019. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) Alfred. Retrieved from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ourstuff/Alfred1864.htm
  10. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 10) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  11. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2011, September 8) George Vasey. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Vasey/George_Alan/Australia.html


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