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Tuer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Tuer can be traced to the ancient Celtic culture of Wales. The surname Tuer is derived from the Welsh word "tew," which means "portly" or "plump," and was most likely originally a nickname for a heavy-set person.

Early Origins of the Tuer family


The surname Tuer was first found in Cardiganshire (Welsh: Sir Aberteifi), the former Kingdom of Ceredigion, created as a county in 1282 by Edward I, and located on the West coast of Wales, where they held a family seat anciently. Traditionally they claim descent from Rhodri Mawr, the first great King of Wales through Lord Rhys, Prince of South Wales. Gwenllian, daughter of John Tew married Dafydd Llywellyn Lloyd of Castle Howel, first knight of the shire for Cardiganshire.

Early History of the Tuer family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tuer research.
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1654, 1718, 1714, 1715, 1650 and 1695 are included under the topic Early Tuer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Tuer Spelling Variations


There are relatively few surnames native to Wales, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. Early variations of Welsh surnames can be explained by the fact that very few people in the early Middle Ages were literate. Priests and the few other literate people were responsible for recording names in official documents. And because most people could not specific how to properly record their names it was up to the individual recorder of that time to determine how a spoken name should be recorded. Variations due to the imprecise or improper recording of a name continued later in history when names originally composed in the Brythonic Celtic, language of Wales, known by natives as Cymraeg, were transliterated into English. Welsh names that were documented in English often changed dramatically since the native language of Wales, which was highly inflected, did not copy well. Occasionally, however, spelling variations were carried out according to an individual's specific design: a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations could be indicated by minor variations. The spelling variations of the name Tuer have included Tew, Tews, Tewell, Tewel, Tuel, Tuell and others.

Early Notables of the Tuer family (pre 1700)


Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was John Tew of Cardigan; Henry Tew (1654-1718), early American 16th Deputy Governor of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (1714-1715); and Thomas Tew (c. 1650-1695), American pirate who gained notoriety in the Red Sea...
Another 45 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Tuer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Tuer family to Ireland


Some of the Tuer family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Tuer family to the New World and Oceana


During the latter half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the people of Wales journeyed to North America to find a new life. They made major contributions to the arts, industry and commerce of both Canada and the United States, and added a rich cultural heritage to their newly adopted societies. A look at the immigration and passenger lists has shown a number of people bearing the name Tuer: Richard Tew, who settled in Newport R.I. in 1641; John Tew, who came to Virginia in 1650; Charles Tew, who came to Maryland in 1760; William Tewell was on record in St. Mary’.

Tuer Family Crest Products



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