Travess History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Travess comes from one of the family having worked as a person who collected a toll from travelers or merchants crossing a bridge. This common practice had the purpose of providing financial resources to maintain the upkeep of the bridge. The surname Travess is derived from the Old English words travers, travas, traves, and travis. These are all derived from the Old French nouns travers and traverse, which refer to the act of passing through a gate or crossing a river or bridge. [1]

Early Origins of the Travess family

The surname Travess was first found in Lancashire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, at Mount Travers, some say before the Norman Conquest in 1066.

The Manor of Skelmerdale in Lancashire proved to reveal some interesting details about the family. According to the Domesday Book, it was originally held by Uctred, who also held Dalton and Uplitherland. Later it was part of the forest fee, held by the Gernet family. "The first of them known to have held it, Vivian Gernet, gave Skelmersdale and other manors to Robert Travers; these were held in 1212 by Henry Travers under Roger Gernet." [2] The manor passed on to the Lovels, but they lost it later after the forfeiture in 1487.

Other early records include Walter de Travers who was listed in Hodgson's History of Northumberland in 1219 and two listings in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273: Hugh Travers in Lincolnshire; and Nigel Travers in Buckinghamshire. Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Robertus Trauers. [3]

The township of Nateby was an early home to this distinguished family. "This township is said to have been in the tenure of the family of Travers, of Tulketh, so far back as the reign of Henry I.; Laurence Travers, who lived soon after that reign, was succeeded by eleven generations, and Nateby appears in possession of William Travers in the reign of Elizabeth." [4]

Early History of the Travess family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Travess research. Another 127 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1590, 1578, 1614, 1609, 1614, 1548, 1635, 1594, 1598, 1525, 1522, 1532, 1770, 1834 and 1647 are included under the topic Early Travess History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Travess Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Travess have been found, including: Travers, Traverse, Travis, Traviss and others.

Early Notables of the Travess family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Henry Travers of Monkstown Castle whose daughter married the Viscount Baltinglass; and Walter Travers (1548?-1635), an English Puritan theologian, chaplain to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, Provost of Trinity College, Dublin from 1594...
Another 41 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Travess Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Travess family to Ireland

Some of the Travess family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 137 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Canada Travess migration to Canada +

Families began migrating abroad in enormous numbers because of the political and religious discontent in England. Often faced with persecution and starvation in England, the possibilities of the New World attracted many English people. Although the ocean trips took many lives, those who did get to North America were instrumental in building the necessary groundwork for what would become for new powerful nations. Among the first immigrants of the name Travess, or a variant listed above to cross the Atlantic and come to North America were :

Travess Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Bartholomew Travess U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 349 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [5]
  • Mrs. Phebe Travess U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 508 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [5]
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Travess U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 481 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [5]
  • Mrs. Hannah Travess U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 475 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [5]
  • Mr. John Travess S. U.E. (b. 1771), aged 12 who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on December 13, 1783 was passenger number 577 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on November 14, 1783 at East River, New York, USA [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Travess Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nec temere nec timide
Motto Translation: Neither rashly nor timidly.


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ 'Townships: Scarisbrick', in A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 3, ed. William Farrer and J Brownbill (London, 1907), pp. 265-276. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol3/pp265-276 [accessed 21 January 2017].
  3. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X


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