Taverner History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Taverner is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It is a name for a person who kept a tavern or public house. [1]

"A family of this name was long seated at Elmham in Norfolk, where Ralph Le Taverner is mentioned in 1272, and only died out in 1682, leaving younger branches to flourish in Essex, Oxfordshire, Bedfordshire. John Taverner, we are told, distinguished himself at Agincourt." [2]

Early Origins of the Taverner family

The surname Taverner was first found in Yorkshire where William le Tauerner, Tauernier was listed in the Pipe Rolls of 1175 and 1177. Later, William le Tavenerner was found in Warwickshire in 1268. [3]

Up in Scotland, one of the first records found was "Henry le Taverner, a crossbowman, one of the English garrison of Linlithgow Castle in 1305." [4]

Early History of the Taverner family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Taverner research. Another 252 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1305, 1361, 1759, 1397, 1407, 1397, 1402, 1406, 1407, 1417, 1417, 1490, 1545, 1505, 1575, 1572, 1584, 1638, 1680, 1768, 1736, 1739, 1690 and 1706 are included under the topic Early Taverner History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Taverner Spelling Variations

A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Taverner, Tabenor, Tabiner, Tavernor, Taviner, Tavenor and many more.

Early Notables of the Taverner family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Taverner (fl. 1397-1407), of Leominster, an English politician, Member of Parliamnet for Leominster in 1397, 1402, 1406 and 1407; William Taverner (fl. 1417), an English politician, Member of the Parliament for Lyme Regis in 1417; and John Taverner (1490-1545), English composer and organist, generally regarded as the most important English composer of his era. Richard Taverner (1505-1575), was...
Another 67 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Taverner Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Taverner family to Ireland

Some of the Taverner family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Taverner migration to the United States +

Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Taverner or a variant listed above:

Taverner Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Taverner, who settled in Virginia in 1607
  • Dan and Giles Taverner, who settled in Virginia in 1654
Taverner Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • John Taverner, who landed in America in 1760-1763 [5]
  • George Taverner, aged 21, who arrived in North Carolina in 1774 [5]
Taverner Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Richard Taverner, who landed in Virginia in 1887 [5]

Canada Taverner migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Taverner Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Margaret Taverner and her family settled in Bay de Verde, Newfoundland, in 1675 [6]
Taverner Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Benjamin and Jacob Taverner, who settled in Trinity, in Newfoundland, in 1725 [6]

Australia Taverner migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Taverner Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. William Taverner, English convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for 14 years, transported aboard the "Dromedary" on 11th September 1819, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [7]
  • John Taverner, English convict from Somerset, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on August 08, 1849, settling in Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia [8]

New Zealand Taverner migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Taverner Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • James Taverner, aged 38, a farm labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Catherine Stewart Forbes" in 1841
  • Mary Ann Taverner, aged 22, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Catherine Stewart Forbes" in 1841

West Indies Taverner migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [9]
Taverner Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Thomas Taverner, who settled in Barbados in 1694

Contemporary Notables of the name Taverner (post 1700) +

  • Colin Taverner, English former professional footballer
  • William Taverner (1703-1772), English judge and amateur landscape artist
  • Mr. John Taverner, British sheriff, held the joint position of Sheriff of Nottingham, England from 1466 to 1466
  • Claire Mitchell- Taverner (b. 1970), Australian gold medalist field hockey player at the 2000 Summer Olympics
  • Percy Algernon Taverner (1875-1947), Canadian ornithologist and architect
  • William Burgoyne Taverner OBE (1879-1958), New Zealand Member of Parliament, Mayor of Dunedin (1927-1929)

Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. James Robert Taverner (1880-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Montreal, Quebec, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Master Henry Taverner (1912-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Montreal, Quebec, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Miss Evelyn Clara Taverner (1909-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Montreal, Quebec, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mrs. Clara Harriet Taverner (1883-1914), née Graves Canadian Third Class Passenger from Montreal, Quebec, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
SS Caribou
  • Mr. Stanley Taverner (b. 1908), Newfoundland crew member from Channel-Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador was travelling aboard the railway ferry "SS Caribou" when it was struck by a German submarine torpedo on 14th October 1942, the most significant sinking in Canadian waters at that time, he died in the sinking
  • Mr. Harold Taverner (b. 1918), Newfoundland crew member from Channel-Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador was travelling aboard the railway ferry "SS Caribou" when it was struck by a German submarine torpedo on 14th October 1942, the most significant sinking in Canadian waters at that time, he died in the sinking
  • Mr. Benjamin Taverner (b. 1880), Newfoundland crew member from Channel-Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador was travelling aboard the railway ferry "SS Caribou" when it was struck by a German submarine torpedo on 14th October 1942, the most significant sinking in Canadian waters at that time, he died in the sinking


  1. ^ Barber, Henry, British Family Names London: Elliot Stock, 62 Paternoster Row, 1894. Print.
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  5. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  6. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  7. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 16th July 2021). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/dromedary
  8. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2014, November 17) Adelaide voyage to Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia in 1849 with 303 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/adelaide/1849
  9. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  10. ^ Commemoration Empress of Ireland 2014. (Retrieved 2014, June 17) . Retrieved from http://www.empress2014.ca/seclangen/listepsc1.html


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