Home

Digital Products

Prints

Apparel

Home & Barware

Gifts


Customer Service



Strait History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Strait is an old Anglo-Saxon name. It comes from when a family lived in any of a number of places called Street, in Hertshire, Kent and Somerset. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Strait is a local surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. Other types of local surnames include topographic surnames, which could be given to a person who lived beside any physical feature, such as a hill, stream, church or type of tree. Habitation names form the other broad category of surnames that were derived from place-names. They were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. Other local names are derived from the names of houses, manors, estates, regions, and entire counties. The surname Strait comes from the Old English word stræt, which means Roman road. In the Middle Ages, this word came to denote the main street in a village, and so the surname may also refer to someone who lived on the main street. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
[3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print



Early Origins of the Strait family


The surname Strait was first found in Devon where they held a family seat from ancient times, but by the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273, the name had scattered throughout ancient Britain as those rolls include: Alice de la Strete, Oxfordshire and Alexander de la Strete, Kent. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

Kirby's Quest listed John atte Strete, Somerset, 1 Edward III (during the first year's reign of Edward III) [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
and the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Elyas del Strete and Alicia del Strete as holding lands there at that time. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


Early History of the Strait family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Strait research.
Another 81 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1621, 1689, 1600, 1666, 1625, 1696, 1621, 1679, 1650, 1670, 1650, 1653, 1653, 1624 and 1680 are included under the topic Early Strait History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Strait Spelling Variations


Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Strait were recorded, including Street, Streat, Strethe, Strete and others.

Early Notables of the Strait family (pre 1700)


Notables of the family at this time include Thomas Street (Streete) (1621-1689), an early English astronomer, best known for his book "Astronomia Carolina, a new theorie of Coelestial Motions" which was used as a reference for many years having at least three editions, eponym of the Street lunar crater. William Streat (1600?-1666), was an English divine, born in Devonshire. Thomas Street (1625-1696), was an English judge and politician from Worcester; Robert Streater (1621-1679), an English landscape, history, still-life and portrait artist, architectural painter and etcher, Serjeant Painter to King Charles II; and John Streater ( fl. 1650-1670), was an...
Another 97 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Strait Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Strait family to Ireland


Some of the Strait family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 30 words (2 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Strait family to the New World and Oceana


To escape oppression and starvation at that time, many English families left for the "open frontiers" of the New World with all its perceived opportunities. In droves people migrated to the many British colonies, those in North America in particular, paying high rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Although many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, those who did see the shores of North America perceived great opportunities before them. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Research into various historical records revealed some of first members of the Strait family emigrate to North America:

Strait Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Mary Strait, who arrived in Virginia in 1695 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Strait Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Charles Strait, aged 21, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Charles Braley" from Port Said, Egypt [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WM-JZP : 6 December 2014), Charles Strait, 28 Jun 1919; citing departure port Port Said, Egypt, arrival port New York, ship name Charles Braley, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Alma Strait, aged 35, who arrived in New York in 1921 aboard the ship "Stockholm" from Gothenburg, Sweden [8]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J621-VZN : 6 December 2014), Alma Strait, 21 Sep 1921; citing departure port Gothenburg, Sweden, arrival port New York, ship name Stockholm, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Contemporary Notables of the name Strait (post 1700)


  • Donald J. Strait, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Army Air Forces, during World War II, credited with 13½ aerial victories
  • Major-General Everett Strait Hughes (1885-1957), American Chief of Ordnance (1946-1949) [9]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2012, March 30) Everett Hughes. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Hughes/Everett_Strait/USA.html
  • Edward Strait Maney (b. 1899), American politician, U.S. Vice Consul in Torreon, 1924; Tampico, 1924-29; Agua Prieta, 1929-30; Southampton, 1932-34; Taihoku, 1935; U.S. Consul in Buenos Aires, 1945-46 [10]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

Strait Family Crest Products



Related Stories



Citations


  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  3. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  4. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  5. ^ Dickinson, F.H., Kirby's Quest for Somerset of 16th of Edward the 3rd London: Harrison and Sons, Printers in Ordinary to Her Majesty, St, Martin's Lane, 1889. Print.
  6. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  7. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WM-JZP : 6 December 2014), Charles Strait, 28 Jun 1919; citing departure port Port Said, Egypt, arrival port New York, ship name Charles Braley, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  8. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J621-VZN : 6 December 2014), Alma Strait, 21 Sep 1921; citing departure port Gothenburg, Sweden, arrival port New York, ship name Stockholm, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  9. ^ Generals of World War II. (Retrieved 2012, March 30) Everett Hughes. Retrieved from http://generals.dk/general/Hughes/Everett_Strait/USA.html
  10. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 8) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


Sign Up