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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The origins of the Anglo-Saxon name Springfield come from its first bearer, who was a young or very active individual, which was originally derived from the Old English word spring literally meaning the season spring. A broad and miscellaneous class of surnames, nickname surnames referred to a characteristic of the first person who used the name. They can describe the bearer's favored style of clothing, appearance, habits, or character. This nickname surname was used to describe the original bearers character as it related to the young shoots in the ground when they would rise from the earth in the spring.

Springfield Early Origins



The surname Springfield was first found in Suffolk where they were major landowners in East Anglia seated from very ancient times, as Lords of the manor of Lavenham, the family were important merchants in the cloth and wool trade during the Middle Ages. The Spring or DeFonte family claim descendancy through Norman, Peter, William, Hugh de Fonte in Normandy who were listed there in a census (1180-1195.) The earliest record of the name in England was found c. 1198 when Reginald and Emma de Fonte were listed there at that time. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
Houghton Le Side in Durham was an ancient family seat. "The vill was a portion of the inheritance of the early lords of Raby, and was granted by Robert Fitz-Mildred to the Springs, of whom Sir John Spring was, in 1312, murdered in his manorhouse here by Robert Lascelles, of Yorkshire." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
and nearby in Houghton Le Spring more early evidence of the family was found. "This place, which takes its name from a family to whom it belonged soon after the Conquest, is one of the great manors of the see of Durham." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Springfield Spelling Variations


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Springfield Spelling Variations



The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Springfield has been spelled many different ways, including Spring, Springe, Springs, Springes, Springer and others.

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Springfield Early History


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Springfield Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Springfield research. Another 347 words (25 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1369, 1369, 1390, 1311, 1313, 1474, 1523, 1547, 1599, 1578, 1579, 1637, 1597, 1613, 1654, 1646, 1648, 1654, 1642, 1684, 1679, 1684, 1672, 1704, 1697, 1737, 1674, 1740 and 1769 are included under the topic Early Springfield History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Springfield Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Springfield Early Notables (pre 1700)



Distinguished members of the family include Thomas Spring (c.1474-1523), also referred to as Thomas Spring III, and Thomas Spring of Lavenham, an English clothier in Suffolk and one of the richest men in England at the time; Sir John Spring (d. 1547), of Lavenham, Buxhall, Hitcham, and Cockfield, Suffolk, was an...

Another 103 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Springfield Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Springfield In Ireland


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Springfield In Ireland



Some of the Springfield family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 41 words (3 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Springfields to arrive in North America:

Springfield Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Andrew Springfield, aged 28, arrived in New York in 1895 aboard the ship "Orinoco" from Bermuda [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXSW-2TG : 6 December 2014), Andrew Springfield, 06 May 1895; citing departure port Bermuda, arrival port New York, ship name Orinoco, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Springfield Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • E. Louise Springfield, aged 26, arrived in New York in 1915 aboard the ship "Evangeline" from Bermuda [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJWZ-36B : 6 December 2014), E. Louise Springfield, 02 Apr 1915; citing departure port Bermuda, arrival port New York, ship name Evangeline, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Samuel Springfield, originally from Aldershot, England, arrived in New York in 1924 aboard the ship "George Washington" from Southampton, England [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNWT-M3G : 6 December 2014), Samuel Springfield, 26 Oct 1924; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name George Washington, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Springfield Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Michael Springfield, who landed in Quebec in 1784
  • Mr. Joseph Springfield U.E. who settled in Western District [The Townships of Essex County and Kent County], Ontario c. 1789 he served in Butlers Rangers [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

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Contemporary Notables of the name Springfield (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Springfield (post 1700)



  • Nelson E. Springfield, American Democrat politician, Candidate for supervisor of Royal Oak Township, Michigan, 1905
  • Tom Springfield (b. 1934), born Dionysius P. A. O'Brien, English musician, songwriter, record producer, brother of Dusty Springfield
  • Dusty Springfield OBE (1939-1999), born Mary Isabel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien, English pop singer and record producer, probably best known for her hits "Wishin' and Hopin'" (1964) and "I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself" (1964)
  • Rick Springfield (b. 1949), born Richard Lewis Springthorpe, Australian Grammy Award-winning singer, best known for hie his hit "Jessie's Girl" (1981)

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Non mihi sed patriae
Motto Translation: Not for myself, but for my country.


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Springfield Family Crest Products


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Springfield Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXSW-2TG : 6 December 2014), Andrew Springfield, 06 May 1895; citing departure port Bermuda, arrival port New York, ship name Orinoco, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JJWZ-36B : 6 December 2014), E. Louise Springfield, 02 Apr 1915; citing departure port Bermuda, arrival port New York, ship name Evangeline, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNWT-M3G : 6 December 2014), Samuel Springfield, 26 Oct 1924; citing departure port Southampton, arrival port New York, ship name George Washington, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  6. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

Other References

  1. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  2. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  3. Burke, Sir Bernard. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry: Including American Families with British Ancestry. (2 Volumes). London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  4. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  5. Sanders, Joanne McRee Edition. English Settlers in Barbados 1637-1800. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  6. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  7. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  8. Holt, J.C. Ed. Domesday Studies. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1987. Print. (ISBN 0-85115-477-8).
  9. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  10. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  11. ...

The Springfield Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Springfield Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 25 October 2016 at 08:07.

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