Seguier History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Of all the French names to come from the Languedoc of France, Seguier is one of the most ancient. The name is a result of the original family having lived in Languedoc.

"Many of this name are to be met with in the Hundred Rolls of the time of Edward I. About 1272, Alan Segeyn, Segin, or Segyn, with John, Robert, and Agnes, Robert's daughter, held in Kent: Hugh in Oxon; Richard Segrim or Segin both there and in Lincoln; and Elias Walter, Henry, and Roger Segrim in Bucks." [1]

Early Origins of the Seguier family

The surname Seguier was first found in Languedoc where they held a family seat in the seigneurie of Reyniès, where they were members of the aristocracy of the region.

By the 13th century they had branched north into Gascogne and Guyenne. They also branched to the east to the Franche-Comté where they held a family seat at Jallerange, and Bourgogne.

In Dauphiné they were elevated to the Marquis de Cabassole in the year 1844 after the French Revolution. Amand Seguin was a celebrated French industrial chemist, 1767-1835. Séguier is the name of a French family of magistrates of whom Pierre, 1588-1672, became a chancellor of France.

Jean Seguin, son of Jacques and Jeanne, arrived in New France from Normandy around the year 1669. He married Lucrece Bellot on 26th August 1669 and together they had five children, three of which were sons. [2]

Early History of the Seguier family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Seguier research. More information is included under the topic Early Seguier History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Seguier Spelling Variations

The many different spellings of French surnames can be partially explained by the use of local dialects and by the influence of other languages during the early development of the French language. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Seguier is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Seguin, Seguine, Seguens, Seguenot, Segui, Seguier, Seguins, Seguines and many more.

Early Notables of the Seguier family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Seguier Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Seguier Ranking

In France, the name Seguier is the 7,379th most popular surname with an estimated 1,000 - 1,500 people with that name. [3]

Migration of the Seguier family

French settlers came early to North American, following in the wake of the explorers, and creating New France. Quebec City, founded in 1608 by Samuel de Champlain is said to have been the first American site founded as a permanent settlement, rather than as just a commercial outpost. But emigration was slow, in 1643, 109 years after the first landings by Cartier, there were only about 300 French people in Quebec, and by 1663, when the region was officially made The Royal Colony of New France, by Louis XIV, there still only around 500 settlers. Over 2,000 would arrive during the next decade. Early marriage was desperately encouraged amongst the immigrants. Youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted immigrants, both noble and commoner from France. By 1675, there were around 7000 French in the colony, and by that same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported to Louisiana. Despite the loss of the Colony to England, the French people flourished in Lower Canada. Among settlers to North America of the Seguier surname were Andrew Seguin settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1799; E. Seguin settled in New York State in 1823; B. Seguin settled in San Francisco Cal. in 1850.


Contemporary Notables of the name Seguier (post 1700) +

  • William Seguier (1771-1843), English artist, born in London, the first keeper of the National Gallery, and superintendent of the British Institution, eldest son of David Seguier, a well-known copyist and art-dealer


The Seguier Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sola salus servire Deo
Motto Translation: The only safe course is to serve God.


  1. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3
  2. ^ Olivier, Reginald L. Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties. Logan: The Everton Publishers, Inc., P.O. Box 368, 1972. Print
  3. ^ http://www.journaldesfemmes.com/nom-de-famille/nom/


Houseofnames.com on Facebook