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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Sawer is rooted in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It is a name for someone who worked as a person who worked as the sawyer. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
[2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
This individual bought wood and cut it with his saw in order to sell it the towns people. Occupational names frequently were derived from the principal object associated with the activity of the original bearer, such as tools or products. These types of occupational surnames are called metonymic surnames. One source claims the name could have been Norman in origin as in "Radulphus de Sahurs, and the Ville of Sahurs, Normandy 1198." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
While this entry is quite a bit later than the Norman Conquest, the presumption is that not all of the family accompanied the Conqueror in 1066.

Sawer Early Origins



The surname Sawer was first found in various counties and shires throughout ancient Britain. The earliest record of the family was found in Berkshire where Nicholas le Sagyere was listed c. 1248. A few years later, Humfrey le Sayhare, le Sawyere, and Robert le Sawyere, le Saweare were both listed in the Assize Rolls of Somerset in 1270. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 also listed some of the first entries for the family: Ralph le Sawiere in Huntingdonshire; and Geoffrey le Sawere in London. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
Further to the north, Philip le Sagher was listed in the Yorkshire in 1324. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
By the 15th century, the name was frequented much further north in Scotland where Alexander Sawer was burgess of Glasgow in 1447 and Andrew Sauer was juror on inquest at Prestwick in 1470. "Thomas Sawar was friar preacher in St. Andrews, 1545." [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

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Sawer Spelling Variations


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Sawer Spelling Variations



It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Sawer are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Sawer include: Sawyer, Sawier, Sawer and others.

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Sawer Early History


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Sawer Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sawer research. Another 314 words (22 lines of text) covering the years 1633, 1692, 1681, 1687, 1783, 1833 and 1812 are included under the topic Early Sawer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sawer Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Sawer Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of the family at this time include Sir Robert Sawyer, of Highclere (1633-1692), Attorney General for England and Wales (1681-1687) and Speaker of the English House of Commons; and Admiral Sir...

Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sawer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sawer In Ireland


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Sawer In Ireland



Some of the Sawer family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 82 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many English families tired of political and religious strife left Britain for the new colonies in North Ameri ca. Although the trip itself offered no relief - conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and many travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute - these immigrants believed the opportunities that awaited them were worth the risks. Once in the colonies, many of the families did indeed prosper and, in turn, made significant contributions to the culture and economies of the growing colonies. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Sawer or a variant listed above:

Sawer Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Eliz Sawer, who landed in Virginia in 1656
  • Rich Sawer, who landed in Virginia in 1658
  • William Sawer, who arrived in Virginia in 1665

Sawer Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • John Peter Sawer, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1796
  • John Sawer landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1796

Sawer Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • John Sawer was a king's carpenter in St. John's, Newfoundland in 1770 [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0

Sawer Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Samuel Sawer settled in St. George's Harbour in 1830

Sawer Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Mr Sawer landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Aurora

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Contemporary Notables of the name Sawer (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Sawer (post 1700)



  • David Sawer (b. 1961), British composer of opera and choral, orchestral and chamber music

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cherches et tu trouveras
Motto Translation: Search and you will find.


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Sawer Family Crest Products


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Sawer Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  6. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0

Other References

  1. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  2. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  3. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  4. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  5. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  6. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  7. Humble, Richard. The Fall of Saxon England. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-88029-987-8).
  8. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  9. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  10. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  11. ...

The Sawer Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Sawer Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 10 November 2016 at 06:06.

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